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Welcome to the Publications Library! Here you will find a searchable index of reports, toolkits, research papers, and other resources relevant to the Small and Growing Business Sector. Sort by clicking on the relevant tags, or by typing in key words in the box below.

 

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Creating Shared Value

Posted By Susannah Eastham, Aspen Institute, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

 "The capitalist system is under siege. In recent years business increasingly has been viewed as a major cause of social, environmental, and economic problems. Companies are widely perceived to be prospering at the expense of the broader community..."

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Tags:  ecosystem  Entrepreneurship  impact investing  Sector publication 

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The Social and Economic Impact of Standard Chartered Ghana

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Standard Chartered commissioned this report to gain an understanding of its economic impact in Ghana. the bank believes it should contribute directly to the economies in which it operates. to this end, it hopes this report will help to inform its future strategy, in Ghana and elsewhere. 

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Tags:  Africa  Development  Economic Growth  Entrepreneurship  Impact Evaluation  impact investing  Sector publication 

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More than Money: Impact Investing for Development

Posted By Susannah Eastham, Aspen Institute, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Much of development policy is geared toward increasing investment and creating the conditions that allow private capital flows to take the place of development assistance. The renowned development success stories—Taiwan, South Korea, Eastern Europe, Costa Rica, and China—have all been marked by a dramatic increase in private investment, both domestic and foreign.

Investments designed specifically to promote development have been increasing. They go by many names, including triple-bottom-line, venture philanthropy, and social-impact investing; they all focus on achieving a development result as well as a financial return, and many have potential for significant returns.

Such investments are not new, but their application across a broad range of sectors—from moderate-income housing, to health care, water and sanitation, and rural development—is recent. And they raise several critical questions for development policy. Do they represent an effective new tool for long-term development? Are they likely to reach the scale necessary to be part of an overall development strategy? There is little data to assess definitively the development impact of this burgeoning activity, but past and current efforts do help indicate whether this sector is worth promoting as a matter of public policy. 

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Tags:  access to finance  Development  Global  impact investing  Sector publication 

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Impact Investing: A Special Report from This is Africa

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

This is a special report on impact investing. Impact investing, which aims to solve social and/or enviromental problems while generating a profit, is on the rise and starting to attract institutional investors.

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 Attached Files:
154-1.pdf (21.58 MB)

Tags:  Entrepreneurship  impact investing  Sector publication 

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Scaling-Up SME Access to Financial Services in the Developing World

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

This report focuses on the scaling up of SMEs. Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) play a major role in economic development, particularly in emerging countries. Studies indicate that formal SMEs contribute up to 45 percent of employment and up to 33 percent of GDP in developing economies; these numbers are significantly higher when taking into account the estimated contributions of SMEs operating in the informal sector. The informal sector presents one of the greatest challenges in the SME space, with issues that go well beyond finance. In the context of the international development agenda, and given the critical importance of job creation in the recovery cycle following the recent financial crisis, promoting SME development appears to be an impor- tant priority. 

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Tags:  access to finance  Economic Growth  Entrepreneurship  Global  impact investing  Sector publication  SME 

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Impact Investments: An Emerging Asset Class

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

"In a world where government resources and charitable donations are insufficient to address the world’s social problems, impact investing offers a new alternative for channeling large-scale private capital for social benefit. With increasing numbers of investors rejecting the notion that they face a binary choice between investing for maximum risk-adjusted returns or donating for social purpose, the impact investment market is now at a significant turning point as it enters the mainstream. In this work, we argue that impact investments are emerging as an alternative asset class. As such, we analyze the questions one would ask when adding impact investments to an investment portfolio."

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Tags:  capital  impact investing  Sector publication  social impact 

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Global Financial Inclusion: Achieving full financial inclusion at the intersection of social benefit and economic sustainability

Posted By Susannah Eastham, Aspen Institute, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

In the past decade, the goal of financial inclusion— ensuring that every individual has access to quality, affordable financial services—has become an increasing priority and possibility worldwide. And as we enter the second decade of the century, the necessary conditions for meeting this goal are coming together.

Financial inclusion aims at benefiting the world’s poor, the vast majority of whom do not use formal financial services of the sort provided by banks, insurers, or microfinance instititutions (MFIs). As a result, they are unable to avail themselves of the fundamental tools of economic self-determination, including savings, credit, insurance, payments, money transfer, and financial education. 

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Tags:  access to finance  Global  impact investing  Poverty  Sector publication 

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Credit Gap - Two Trillion and Counting

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

 This report reviews micro, small, and medium-size enterprises (MSMEs—enterprises that typically have fewer than 250 employees) that contribute significantly to economic development. This is particularly evident in developing countries, where formal MSMEs represent approximately 45 percent of employment and approximately 33 percent of GDP.2 This contribution to economic development is even greater when informal MSMEs—that is, enterprises that are not formally registered—are included. 

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Tags:  access to finance  Entrepreneurship  impact investing  Sector publication  SME 

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Money for Good: The US Market for Impact Investments

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

For the first time since 1994's The Seven Faces of Philanthropy, the Money for Good (MFG) initiative provides a comprehensive understanding of the behaviors, attitudes, and motivations of affluent Americans with respect to impact investing, charitable giving, and international entrepreneurship.

Leveraging a nationwide survey of 4,000 Americans with household incomes of $80,000 a year and above, the Money for Good initiative analyzed the US market opportunity for impact investments and charitable gifts for individuals. The initiative also identified what for- and non-profit organizations can do to "unlock" that market opportunity, by serving their donors and investors more effectively.

The Money for Good research was run from December 2009 April 2010. The initiative was funded by the ANDE Capacity Development Fund (CDF), the Rockefeller Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, and the Metanoia Fund. A core group of ANDE members supported the Money for Good grant proposal to the CDF, and were partners throughout the initiative. These organizations included E&Co, Endeavor, Ignia Partners, Mercy Corps, Root Capital, ShoreBank, TechnoServe, and VisionSpring. 

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Tags:  charitable giving  entrepreneurship  impact investing  Philanthropy  Sector publication 

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Building Houses, Financing Homes: India's Rapidly Growing Housing and Housing Finance Markets for the Low-Income Customer

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, August 25, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Rapid urbanization has led to an increase in the number of low income households in India’s cities. Despite a vibrant housing market in India, decent housing in the formal sector is beyond the reach of the vast majority of these lower income households. Monitor Inclusive Markets conducted a study in 2006-7 for NHB (funded by FIRST Initiative and with active support by the World Bank), which found that even the cheapest houses in the market, were at best affordable2 for the top 15% of the urban population. Customers in the next 30% income seg- ment generally rented rooms in slums and low income neighborhoods.

They lived in poorly constructed houses with deplorable sanitary conditions (shared toilets, bad drainage and water- logging) and lacking basic neighborhood amenities (few common spaces or gardens, unsafe alleys, open gutters). Many families had tiny quarters, for which they paid high rent and yet remained at the mercy of their landlords. Moreover, these customers aspired to live in and could afford to buy houses between 250-400 square feet in suburban areas at current market prices, but there was virtually no supply of houses, and almost no access to mortgages from traditional financial institutions (even more the case for informal sector customers). 

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Tags:  access to finance  impact investing  India  Sector publication 

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