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Welcome to the Publications Library! Here you will find a searchable index of reports, toolkits, research papers, and other resources relevant to the Small and Growing Business Sector. Sort by clicking on the relevant tags, or by typing in key words in the box below.

 

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Top tags: sector publication  impact investing  Entrepreneurship  ANDE publication  Access to Finance  Global  2018  Social entrepreneurship  women  Development  accelerators  Africa  Economic Growth  SGB  SME  impact evaluation  finance  India  latin america  GALI  2016  Agriculture  ecosystem  social enterprise  gender  SGBs  social impact  2017  Environment  investors 

UNDP Bangladesh Women and Youth entrepreneurship

Posted By Stella Hanly, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, December 12, 2011

2004

Bangladesh is one of the world’s poorest countries and the population is predominantly rural, with about 85 per cent of its 140 million people living in rural areas. Rural people depend mainly on the land for their livelihoods, which is both fertile and extremely vulnerable and large areas are at risk because of frequent floods and cyclones.

It is estimated that rural poverty rates now stands at around 50 per cent, and more than 25 per cent of rural households live in extreme poverty. With this existing situation, chronically poor people, especially women,suffer persistent food insecurity, own no cultivable land or assets, are often illiterate and may also suffer serious illnesses or disabilities. One of the main causes of rural poverty in Bangladesh is extreme climate and a large proportion of the country is low-lying and vulnerable to flooding. Many rural poor people live in areas subject to extreme annual flooding, which can destroy their crops, homes and livelihoods. Another root cause of rural poverty has been the enormous population growth and the pressure it has placed on the environment; unleashing problems such as erosion and flooding that in turn aggravate the situation of rural poor people.

Women are among the poorest of the rural poor, especially when they are the heads of their households,such as widows or wives of men who have migrated in search of employment. They suffer discrimination because of their gender, they have scarce income-earning opportunities and their nutritional intake is often inadequate. Among extremely poor people, there is a disproportionate number of households headed by women.

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Tags:  Bangladesh  Entrepreneurship  sector publication  Women  Youth 

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The Global Glass Ceiling

Posted By Stella Hanly, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, December 12, 2011


May/June 2010

Over the last several decades, it has become accepted wisdom that improving the status of women is one of the most critical levers of international development. When women are educated and can earn and control income, a number of good results follow: infant mortality declines, child health and nutrition improve, agricultural productivity rises, population growth slows, economies expand, and cycles of poverty are broken.

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Tags:  Development  Entrepreneurship  Global  impact investing  sector publication  Women 

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The Business of Empowering Women

Posted By Stella Hanly, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, December 12, 2011

January 2010

The business of empowering women presents a case for why and how the private sector should intensify its engagement in the economic empowerment of women in developing countries and emerging markets.

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Tags:  Entrepreneurship  Global  impact investing  sector publication  Women 

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The Third Billion

Posted By Stella Hanly, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, December 12, 2011

June 2010

As growing numbers of women enter the economic mainstream, they will have a profound effect on global business.

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Tags:  Development  Entrepreneurship  Global  sector publication  Women 

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Promoting Women’s Entrepreneurship Development based on Good Practice Programmes: Some Experiences from the North to the South

Posted By Stella Hanly, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, December 12, 2011

2001

The purpose of this paper is to examine women’s entrepreneurship support programmes in the context of developed countries in order to formulate recommendations for their replicability in developing countries. The focus is on good practice, and the programmes reviewed in the paper were selected based on a combination of performance criteria and their potential for replicability. The performance criteria used were: outreach/scale, effectiveness, cost efficiency, impact and sustainability.

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Tags:  emerging markets  Entrepreneurship  sector publication  Women 

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ILO strategy on promoting women’’s entrepreneurship development

Posted By Stella Hanly, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, December 12, 2011

March 2008

The Committee on Employment and Social Policy requested the Office in November 2007 to prepare a strategy paper on women’s entrepreneurship development (WED) for its consideration. The first section of this paper presents the background to the issue within the Office and introduces the case for an enhanced focus on WED. Section II outlines the evolution of WED activities within the Office. Section III presents the lessons learned,while Section IV outlines a proposed future strategy (also summarized in Appendix I). Finally, Section V describes how the strategy would be put into effect.

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Tags:  Development  Entrepreneurship  sector publication  Women 

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Women's Entrepreneurship Development in Vietnam - Vietnam Chamber of Commerce and Industry & the Industrial Labour Organisation

Posted By Saurabh Lall, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Thursday, November 17, 2011
September 2007

Women play a very important role in the economic development of Vietnam. They are involved in business activities at all levels, making
important contributions to economic growth. Nowadays, Vietnamese women are increasingly active in parts of the economy that were previously considered male domain. Women entrepreneurs also create jobs. By December 2005, it was estimated that 24% of the 113,352 incorporated enterprises were owned by women. On top of that, an estimated 27% of 3 million household businesses are owned by women.

The research underlying this report aimed to assess the development patterns of women- and men-owned enterprises in Vietnam. It  identified the constraints and opportunities faced by male and female entrepreneurs as well as their needs with emphasis on the demands for business development services and representation.

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Tags:  Entrepreneurship  policy  sector publication  Vietnam  women 

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Global Entrepreneurship Monitor 2010 - Babson College & Universidad del Desarrollo

Posted By Saurabh Lall, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Thursday, November 17, 2011
2011

With this report, the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) has completed 12 annual surveys of the entrepreneurial attitudes, activities and aspirations of individuals around the world. Starting with just 10 developed countries in 1999, GEM has grown
to include over 80 economies during the course of these 12 years. In 2010, over 175,000 people were surveyed in 59 economies. These 59 economies represent not only the largest sample yet, but also the most geographically and economically diverse group
surveyed. Together, this group covers over 52% of the world’s population and 84% of the world’s GDP. 

The 2010 survey shows that, in the economies analyzed, some 110 million people between 18 and 64 years old were actively engaged in starting a business. Another 140 million were running new businesses they started less than 3½ years earlier. Taken together, some 250 million were involved in what GEM defines as early stage entrepreneurial activity. Out of these individuals, an estimated 63 million people expected to hire at least five employees over the next five years, and 27 million of these individuals anticipated hiring twenty or more employees in five years. This illustrates the contribution of entrepreneurship to job growth across the globe.

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Tags:  Dataset  Economic Growth  Entrepreneurship  Global  sector publication  Women 

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Patterns of Business Creation, Survival and Growth: Evidence from Africa - World Bank - Klapper, Richmond

Posted By Saurabh Lall, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, November 14, 2011
October 2011

The authors study firm dynamics using a novel database of all formally registered firms in Cote d'Ivoire from 1977 to 1997, which account for about 60 percent of gross domestic product. They examine entry and exit patterns and the role of new and exiting firms versus incumbents in job creation and destruction. They find that while the rate of job creation at new firms is quiet high—at 8 percent on average—the number of jobs added by new firms is small in absolute terms. 


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Tags:  Cote d'Ivoire  Entrepreneurship  Jobs  Policy  sector publication  SME  West Africa 

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Doing Business 2011: Making a Difference for Entrepreneurs

Posted By Saurabh Lall, Aspen Institute - ANDE, Monday, November 14, 2011
2010

Doing Business 2011 is the eighth in a series of annual reports benchmarking the regulations that enhance business activity and those that constrain it. The report presents quantitative indicators on business regulation and the protection of property rights for 183 economies—from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. The data are current as of June 2010.
A fundamental premise of Doing Business is that economic activity requires good rules—rules that establish and clarify property rights and reduce the cost of resolving disputes; rules that increase the predictability of economic interactions and provide contractual partners with certainty and protection against abuse. The objective is regulations designed to be efficient, accessible to all and simple in their implementation. Doing Business gives higher scores in some areas for stronger property rights and investor protections, such as stricter disclosure requirements in related-party transactions.

Doing Business takes the perspective of domestic, primarily smaller companies and measures the regulations applying to them through their life cycle. Economies are ranked on the basis of 9 areas of regulation—for starting a business, dealing with construction permits, registering property, getting credit, protecting investors, paying taxes, trading across borders, enforcing contracts and closing a business. In addition, data are presented for regulations on employing workers and for a set of pilot indicators on getting electricity.

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Tags:  Entrepreneurship  Global  policy  private sector development  sector publication 

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