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Measuring what really matters

Posted By Nicolás Díaz Ferro, BBVA, Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Following up on prior work, the BBVA Microfinance Foundation has published its 2017 Social Performance Report.

The results continue to be encouraging: more than 80% of new clients served are in economic vulnerability,  which reflects BBVAMF Group’s permanent commitment to serve vulnerable entrepreneurs. 

In addition, clients’ businesses continue to grow consistently over time: their net incomes grow at an average yearly rate of 16% and their assets 24%.

However, for low-income entrepreneurs, income levels are as important as stability over time. Entrepreneurs served by the Group are frequently exposed to variations in their economic status which may result in their entering and coming out of poverty more than once. 50% remain in their economic vulnerability segment (they are stable), while 22% cross the poverty line at least twice (they are volatile) and 23% overcome poverty. Precarity and instability are intrinsic to their situation: they are more exposed to shocks and to the idiosyncrasies of the markets where they operate. 

BBVAMF supports and contributes to the development of these vulnerable entrepreneurs’ skillset, so that they can make good progress, improving their current and future standard of living through their productive work and effort. All the merit of any success the clients may have in their endeavors, however small, is entirely theirs.

However, there  is great potential to continue advancing in the understanding of the performance of the vulnerable entrepreneur to better address their needs. These factors are critical to keep up the success in fulfilling the Group's mission.

The ultimate goal is for these people’s progress to be sustainable and as broad and wide-ranging as possible, having an impact on the various dimensions of their economic and social development. The Microfinance Foundation recognizes the magnitude of the challenge that poverty alleviation and financial inclusion mean. In recognition of this challenge, numerous actors must be involved, and joint public and private efforts need to be made.

The BBVA Microfinance Foundation

The BBVA Microfinance Foundation was set up in 2007 by BBVA, as part of its corporate social responsibility to use its more than 150 years of experience to support vulnerable people with productive activities to improve their lives.

It has consolidated a Group of six microfinance institutions that serve over 1.9 million people in five different countries (Colombia, Peru, Dominican Republic, Chile and Panama).

The Group’s gross portfolio is USD 1.1 billion and it signed off more than USD 10 billion in loans to vulnerable entrepreneurs (2007-2017). With over 500 offices and 8,000 employees, it has become a philanthropic institution with one of the greatest social impacts in Latin America, the first operator with proprietary methodology in the region.

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Impact Investing: Where are the Women?

Posted By Reuben Coulter, Transformational Business Network, Thursday, June 21, 2018

Only 7% of applicants were female - that's crazy!!

Over the past month I've been advertising for an Investment Director to lead our impact investing portfolio. To date, we've received 52 applications and only 4 of those were women - that's 7%. Where are all the female investors?

The opportunity

This is a major problem for impact investing which seeks to create economic and social transformation. Investors who are predominantly male will have an inherent bias and so may fail to engage with this enormous opportunity. Research in the US showed that male venture capitalists were much more likely to invest in male founders and it's unlikely to be any different in the impact space.

The opportunity is enormous. Consider the following:

  • Credit gap: Women SME’s worldwide face a $320 billion shortfall in access to credit despite women anecdotally having lower non-performing loan rates than men.
  • A multi-trillion dollar opportunity: According to a McKinsey study, closing the gender labor gap could add $28 trillion, or 26 percent, to annual global GDP in 2025.
  • The world’s largest emerging market: The female economy represents a market more than ­twice the size of India and China combined. By 2028, female consumers will control around $15 trillion of global consumer spending.
  • Our portfolio of purpose-driven entrepreneurs in Africa is currently 54% womenand we have found them more willing to work collaboratively to tackle social issues.

One piece of good news to emerge from the G7 (which you may have missed with all the Trump furore), is that their Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) have proposed a bold commitment to the 2X Challenge: Financing for Women to mobilise investment in the world’s women.

How can we address this issue?

For this commitment and impact investment in general to succeed we must nurture more female investors. I'd love your suggestions on how we can do this and who is already pioneering. Please include in the comments section below.

NB: We're Hiring!

If you know a fantastic female Investment Director then please let her know about our vacancy at TBN. Closing date 27th June.

 

Tags:  impact investing  Women 

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African Management Initiative releases impact report: A scalable model that is transforming organisations and empowering thousands of small businesses

Posted By Rebecca Harrison, African Management Initiative, Thursday, June 21, 2018

Does talent development for SGBs really work? Talent has been on the SGB agenda for several years now, but the evidence base around impact, RoI, what works and why, has been thin. The African Management Initiative (AMI) has released its 2017 impact report, and for the first time, has generated data that starts to demonstrate a direct link between skills development in SGBs, and bottom-line business performance. The report demonstrates how a disruptive and scalable approach to learning has helped companies strengthen their teams and empowered thousands of small businesses, demonstrating real impact and return on investment for talent-forward SGBs. Dive into our impact data and read inspiring stories to learn more about our programmes for entrepreneurs, employees, managers and youth, and for reflections on what's working, and what can be improved.

 AMI in Numbers

The African Management Initiative is a social enterprise delivering Africa’s first scalable solution for workplace learning. AMI transforms African organizations, and empowers entrepreneurs, managers, entry-level workers and job-seekers through practical and affordable learning tools. At the end of 2017, AMI had trained almost 18,000 individuals through structured blended learning programmes in 11 African countries, including around 14,000 entrepreneurs. To date, a total of 55,000 individuals have engaged with the AMI online platform, and have downloaded over 1 million tools. In 2017, AMI expanded its portfolio, working with large intermediaries to serve thousands of entrepreneurs, while continuing to run management and leadership programmes directly with larger businesses, and organisations in health, education, and civil society.

For the first time this year, AMI generated data proving that its programmes not only help build the skills of the individual participants who take them, but also drive the business performance of organisations. This is a game changer in demonstrating how talent links with SGB performance, and in proving the RoI for developing people. AMI data showed that 92% of client leads saw improvements in management and leadership skills among their employees with 100% of clients saying business improved after they ran AMI learning programmes with their employees. Of those, 92% reported an improvement in operating efficiency and 92% reported improved customer satisfaction. As Richard Branson said, look after your staff, and your staff will look after your customers… Interestingly, investing in even just a small group of managers seemed to have a ripple effect more broadly on company culture, with 92% of clients reporting improved productivity across the whole company and 96% reporting improved engagement.

As well as running management and leadership programmes with the staff of growing and established businesses, AMI also reaches thousands of SMEs and entrepreneurs through partnerships with intermediaries – including many ANDE members. The report indicates that 100% of entrepreneurs who completed a post-programme survey saw a change in their business after engaging with AMI. Of these, 75% reported an improvement in revenue, 73% increased profit, 50% created new jobs and 35% secured debt or equity funding. All of them attributed that change at least partly to the AMI programme. To support SMEs and entrepreneurs even further, AMI has designed a new Grow Your Business programme, which aims to provide scalable business development support by giving SMEs the tools and support they need to embed good business practices into their companies. This programme is being tested rigorously through a Randomised Control Trial with a team of researchers at MIT. Watch this space for more data from this study later in the year.

 Read the full 2017 report to dig deeper into AMI’s current impact data and see what partners and clients are saying about the impact of the training programmes. 

VIEW THE FULL REPORT

 

 

Tags:  accelerators  Africa  East Africa  entrepreneurship  impact measurement  innovation  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  Skills Gap  small and growing businesses impact investing  social entrepreneurship  sustainability  talent  Training 

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GroFin - Transforming SGBs in Africa & the Middle East

Posted By Shailen Neewoor, GroFin, Wednesday, June 13, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Gain a deeper understanding of how GroFin, through its unique investment model in SGBs, is positively transforming small and growing businesses and the local communities they support. The inspiring success stories of its entrepreneurs exemplify the collaborative efforts of GroFin staff, investors, partners and clients. The 2017 GroFin Impact Report, Nomou Impact Report and Aspire Impact Report translates its faith in the power of the collective by asking the question “If not us, who? If not today, when? If not with our finance and support, how will these small businesses grow and succeed?”

2017 GroFin Impact Report

As at end 2017, GroFin has financed 675 small and growing businesses, supported 8,840 entrepreneurs, sustained a total of 86,190 jobs and touched the lives of 430,955 family members in the local communities across our 15 locations of operation in Africa and the Middle East. The report indicates that GroFin has made more investments in its priority sectors of education, healthcare, agribusiness, manufacturing and key services. Furthermore, GroFin invested US$ 60M in nearly 88 new small and growing businesses, with over 50% of the SMEs operating directly in our sectors of focus, sustaining 14,000 total jobs and supporting an additional 72,000 livelihoods. And to reinforce its value proposition of providing 'support beyond finance' the company introduced the GroFin STEP (Success through Effective Partnerships) Programme to support its SMEs and Entrepreneurs.

2017 Nomou Impact Report

The Nomou Programme is a regional initiative in MENA which was co-created by GroFin and Shell Foundation. As a result of the collaborative efforts of its investors, partners and clients, the Nomou programme is contributing to the alleviation of poverty and improvement of livelihoods in the communities where the programme operates, as well as striving to reduce the adverse impact of the humanitarian crisis in the region.

In 2017, the Nomou Programme supported 1,005 entrepreneurs, made investments into 103 SGBs, sustained a total of 10,287 jobs, touched the lives of 51,435 beneficiaries and added economic value of US$ 149 million per annum through its investee SMEs across Egypt, Jordan, Iraq and Oman.

2017 Aspire Impact Report

Since their inception in 2014, the Aspire Small Business Fund (ASBF) and the Aspire Growth Fund (AGF) have sought to promote local entrepreneurship, employment and economic value-add in the Niger Delta. With the Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Limited (SPDC) as anchor investor, the Aspire Enterprise Development Funds epitomise GroFin, a private development finance institution, and SPDC’s efforts to serve the local community with a combination of investment funds, business skills and market linkages.

In 2017 GroFin increased its commitment to supporting SMEs in the Niger Delta Region by investing in an additional 17 small and growing businesses and extending further funding of US$ 2.5M (140% increase from total amount invested as at end 2016). As at end of 2017, GroFin has supported 365 businesses, invested in 53 SMEs and sustained a total of 1,975 jobs under the Aspire Funds.

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Tags:  2017  A Access to Finance  Access to Finance  Africa  Agriculture  ANDE Africa  ANDE Members  Base of the Pyramid  Business  business training  capacity development  DGGF  East Africa  education  finance  impact  impact investing  impact investing; gender lens investing; gender; w  impact investment  impact measurement  innovation  Investors  Kenya  MENA  missing middle  Philanthropy; impact investing  Private sector development  Rwanda  SDGs  SGB  SGBs  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  SGBs; Environment; accelerators; energy  SGBs; West Africa; Senegal; Africa; MENA; Entrepre  small and growing agrobusiness  smes  social impact  South Africa  sustainability  sustainable development  Tanzania  Training  Uganda  West Africa 

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SEPTEMBER OPPORTUNITY - STREET BUSINESS SCHOOL

Posted By Amy Yanda-Lee, BeadforLife, Monday, June 4, 2018
 
Street Business School announces it is accepting applications for its transformative workshop that teaches other organizations how to train Street Business School in their communities. 
  • Looking to take social programs for people living in poverty to a whole new level?
  • Do you recognize helping people increase their income would enhance everything you do, but unsure where to begin?
Get certified to train Street Business School, a ready-to-deliver entrepreneurial training program designed for individuals living in poverty. Street Business School is now active in seven countries across Africa, and the results are transformational: 

-211% increase in income (women are going from $1.35/day to $4.19/day)

-89% of graduates have businesses two years later

-15X income increase for those joining SBS earning less than $.65/day

 
Apply to join us this September and participate in an exciting and transformative Immersion Workshop: http://www.streetbusinessschool.org/workshops/

If you know a group who would benefit from adding income generation to their programs, please refer them to us! info@streetbusinessschool.org. 

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Tags:  empowerment  NGOs  Social entrepreneurship  social franchising 

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Upaya Social Ventures Accelerates Agri-Businesses in India to Create Jobs for Ultra Poor

Posted By Devyani Singh, Aspen Institute, Tuesday, May 15, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Upaya Social Ventures Announces Social Enterprises Selected for its Accelerator

11 innovative startups have been selected to join Upaya’s accelerator cohort focused on the agriculture industry in India.

Upaya Social Ventures today announced the 11 companies selected for its second accelerator program, which will target the agribusiness industry in India. The 11 participating companies were selected from a competitive pool of 281 applications by a committee of impact investing, agriculture, and social sector experts. The entrepreneurs represent cities across India and agriculture sub-sectors such as organics, processing and agri-waste.

About Upaya Social Ventures: Upaya creates dignified jobs for the poorest of the poor by building scalable businesses with investment and consulting support. Since 2011, Upaya has supported 14 small and growing businesses in India with investments and expertise. Upaya partners have created nearly 8,000 jobs. With offices in Seattle, Washington and Bangalore, India, Upaya has committed to a goal of helping partners create 15,000 jobs by the end of 2019. For more information about Upaya, visit www.upayasv.org.

Read the press release here (cohort overview attached)

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Tags:  agriculture  india  SGB  upaya 

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GroFin partners with Mastercard Foundation on US$50M youth employment initiative in Rwanda

Posted By Nishika Bajaj, GroFin, Tuesday, May 1, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Kigali: May 1, 2018 – Private development finance institution GroFin has partnered with Mastercard Foundation to extend business development support and catalyse investment to small and growing businesses in the tourism and hospitality sector of Rwanda.

GroFin is joining the Mastercard Foundation’s Hanga Ahazaza initiative, a US $50 million, five-year initiative focused on relieving poverty by increasing employment opportunities for young people while expanding the tourism and hospitality sector in Rwanda.

Hanga Ahazaza, meaning ‘create the future’ in Kinyarwanda, will equip 30,000 young men and women with the skills they need to transition to employment and increase access to financial services and business development skills for small businesses in this thriving sector. The initiative aligns with GroFin’s focus on increasing employment opportunities for youth and women.

“Working together, we will support small businesses in the tourism and hospitality sector and ensure the sector can find qualified young people with the skills needed to be successful employees or entrepreneurs,” says Guido Boysen, CEO of GroFin.

Over the next three years, the GroFin-managed Small and Growing Businesses Fund will invest in 12 small enterprises operating in the tourism and hospitality sector of Rwanda. GroFin will screen and identify 120 small and growing businesses in this sector to provide pre-finance business development assistance. Of these, 12 are expected to go on to qualify for GroFin’s investment and post-finance business support.

These businesses will be chosen based on their potential to impact economically disadvantaged individuals, with focus on small enterprises that employ a substantial proportion of youth and women, as well as those that are owned by women.

Using this approach, GroFin’s activities will sustain a total of 1,200 jobs and support 4,500 livelihoods for economically disadvantaged individuals. Two-thirds of these jobs will be created and sustained for youth and women.

“We look forward to collaborating with GroFin as part of the Hanga Ahazaza initiative” said Rica Rwigamba, Program Manager at the Mastercard Foundation. “Their unique approach to providing a combination of appropriate finance, tailored business support and market linkages will help small businesses in the hospitality and tourism sector reach their full potential and generate more employment and entrepreneurship opportunities for young people.”

Hanga Ahazaza is led by a consortium of partners from the education, development, and private sectors. Working together, they will support small businesses and entrepreneurs in the tourism and hospitality sector through increased access to financial services and training, and by connecting them to young people with the skills needed to be successful employees.

About GroFin

GroFin is a pioneering private development finance institution specialising in the finance and support of small and medium enterprises.

Since its inception in 2004, GroFin has established a wide network of local offices in 15 countries across Africa and the Middle East covering Kenya, Rwanda, Uganda, Tanzania, Nigeria, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Senegal, South Africa, Zambia, Mauritius, Egypt, Oman, Jordan and Iraq.

As at close of 2017, GroFin had undertaken 675 SME investments and sustained 86,191 jobs across healthcare, education, agribusiness, manufacturing, water, energy and waste services, food and accommodation, construction, wholesale and retail, and professional services.

About the Mastercard Foundation

The Mastercard Foundation seeks a world where everyone has the opportunity to learn and prosper. The Foundation’s work is guided by its mission to advance learning and promote financial inclusion for people living in poverty. One of the largest foundations in the world, it works almost exclusively in Africa. It was created in 2006 by Mastercard International and operates independently under the governance of its own Board of Directors. The Foundation is based in Toronto, Canada. For more information and to sign up for the Foundation’s newsletter, please visit www.mastercardfdn.org. Follow the Foundation at @MastercardFdn on Twitter.

Tags:  Access to finance  impact investing  SMEs 

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We are measuring impact BEYOND sustainability. What about you?

Posted By Cecilia Latapí, SVX México, Friday, April 27, 2018
Hello!
 
We want to invite you to join a collaborative effort to define what REGENERATIVE - going beyond sustainability - means in our daily practice and to design the metrics for measuring it. Our aim is to collect as many opinions as possible from regenerative practitioners and others with different perspectives, taking into account as many voices as possible before ReGen18 in early May 2018.
 
In the words of Kevin Jones, co-convenor of ReGen18 and co-founder of SOCAP: "the challenge for regenerative metrics is that we have to find a way for them to add value, instead of being seen as a cost." 
 
The intention of this undertaking is a collaboratively-designed, co-created regenerative tool to provide organizations the capacity to determine the positive and negative impacts of their practices while establishing some common ground on what regeneration means, its sector-specific metrics, and guidance on best practices for generating Regenerative outcomes. 
 
As a first step, we invite you to participate in the following survey: https://goo.gl/forms/Q7tZMLp5fIKRSOIu1 
 
The results of this survey will be made available to all participants and presented during ReGen18 for further discussion and exploration. After the event, we will keep working on the project on a shared platform, aiming to develop our regenerative tool with your participation (the resulting tool will be placed in the public domain under a Creative Commons license).
 
If you are doing something similar, working on ideas that could contribute or are interested in co-creating in this exciting new field of endeavor, we want to hear from you!
 
Thanks for co-creating with us.  We look forward to your contributions.
 
 
- Holly Dublin, Kevin Jones, Cecilia Latapi, Laura Ortiz Montemayor, Shaun Paul @ ReGen18

Tags:  Environment  impact assessment  impact investing  impact investing; gender lens investing; gender; w  Performance Measurement  Private sector development  Risk; Risk Assessment; ANDE Members  study  Survey  sustainability  sustainable development  sustainable energy 

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Webinar: What Does ‘Impact’ Mean to You?

Posted By Mia Haughton, Vera Solutions, Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Live Webinar on Thursday, May 3rd at 10am (BST)

Every nonprofit is working towards making a positive change in some way, be it in the lives of individuals, our communities, or the world we live in. But how do you measure the impact of the good work you do?

Nonprofits who want to increase their mission’s reach need to define what success looks like to them so that they can measure it more effectively. Join us for a live panel discussion where three nonprofit trailblazers from different ends of the spectrum, each with their own unique insights and real-world experience on the topic, will answer the question: what does ‘impact’ mean to you?

Speakers:

Zak Kaufman, Co-Founder & CEO at Vera Solutions
Joanne Trotter, Global Lead, Results and Learning at the Aga Khan Foundation
Amanda Feldman, Director at The Impact Management Project

Don’t miss out, save your seat today >>>

 

Tags:  impact measurement  innovation  Performance Measurement  salesforce  social impact  webinar 

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Social Enterprise Franchising Webinar

Posted By Stage Six, Friday, April 6, 2018
https://www.unh.edu/social-innovation/social-sector-franchising-initiative-webinar-1

Register for this webinar about using franchising to scale SGBs here:  https://www.unh.edu/social-innovation/social-sector-franchising-initiative-webinar-1?platform=hootsuite

 

Social Sector Franchising Initiative 2018 Webinar Series

 

Replication and Scaling for Impact: What are the options?
Does Social Franchising have a competitive advantage?  


 

Image of Family at a Supply Hope MarketWednesday, April 11, 2018 
10:00 a.m.  - 11:00 a.m. (-5 GMT)
Online 

 

 

 

 

In this first webinar of the Social Sector Franchise Initiative 2018 Webinar series we will explore a variety of issues and questions about scaling social enterprises. There is an urgent need to scale promising social enterprises that can meet vital human needs. But are we making headway in identifying the most effective pathways to scale? What do we know about the various options for scaling social enterprises, in terms of their relative abilities to reach significant numbers of customers while holding true to their social mission? Why do many social enterprises fail to scale?  What are the roles of industry facilitators and service providers in enabling scale? We often assume scaling equals replication—what are other routes to scale?

Reaching scale can be challenging and some research says fewer than 1 percent of startups scale. This is due to many factors including: the team and leadership’s ability to manage scale; the enterprise’s business model and technology readiness; fit in new territories; and access to or quality of funding and partnerships.  Organizations often use several strategies, depending on opportunities and geographic differences. Does this complicate scale, or does this help the enterprise adapt in new markets? 

What about social sector franchising as a potential gamechanger for scaling social enterprise? Franchising enables a business to grow exponentially while maintaining standards and achieving economies of scale. Franchising drives economic development by increasing opportunities for jobs and business ownership, and creating pipelines of social enterprises capable achieving higher returns for impact investors.  Franchising   has   an advantage when the business model, technology, and market changes little. It also helps with the uptake of business models by aspiring entrepreneurs. Yet, could there be challenges for franchising when scaling requires more changes?

Bill Maddocks our webinar moderator will explore these issues and more with our four guests who represent a wide range of experience in scaling and replicating social enterprises around the world.

 


 

Webinar Guests:
 

Image of EmmaEmma Colenbrander
Emma is the director of a new initiative at Practical Action that is coordinating a wide range of distribution models to coordinate learning and look for economies of scale. The Global Distributors Collective (GDC) is a partnership-based model that acts as a ‘one stop shop’ for last mile businesses, offering support, information and expertise to overcome the challenges of accessing life-changing technologies. It provides a collective voice for distributors to ensure their voice is heard; drives research and innovation across the sector; facilitates the exchange of information, insight and expertise; and helps pilot, test and scale innovative solutions.

Image of NeilNeal Harrison 
Neal A. Harrison is Associate Director of the Replication Initiative at Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship. In this role, Neal is focused on scaling-out business models and technologies by developing sector-specific playbooks to spread best practices, as well as supporting entrepreneurs design their scaling strategy. He has over 10 years of experience building start-ups and leading innovation projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, North America, and Europe.

 

Image of DavidDavid Koch 
David Koch is a partner and co-founder of Plave Koch PLC, a boutique law firm focused on franchising, licensing, and branded distribution. He has over 25 years of experience with clients in foodservice, hotels, educational services, entertainment events, veterinary, staffing, car rental, homeowner services, retail, and other industries. His work involves structuring franchise and license programs, supply chain arrangements, private equity investments in franchising, corporate and commercial transactions, regulatory compliance, antitrust counseling, and cross-border expansion.

David holds an adjunct faculty appointment with the International Transactions Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School, his alma mater, and serves in a similar but informal capacity with the International Transactions Clinic at NYU School of Law. He has spoken at numerous franchise legal and business conferences, including programs in Japan, India, Guatemala, Poland, Romania, England and Canada, and he has authored or co-authored more than 40 published articles and conference papers. Before entering private practice, he was an Attorney-Advisor to the Chairman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.
 

Image of JulieJulie McBride
Julie is a thought leader in the field of social franchising and was recently named one of “Five Innovative Consultants that are changing the world” in Inc. Magazine.  Julie’s experience using the franchise model to scale social businesses spans 20 years, five continents, and several industries including healthcare, water, sanitation, agribusiness, clean energy, and education.  She was instrumental in designing and operating PSI’s pioneering reproductive health franchise in Pakistan (Green Star) and supported the expansion of social franchises into 27 additional countries.  As a franchise consultant at MSA Worldwide Julie helped social business owners and NGOs design and execute franchise systems.  In her most recent venture as founder and CEO of Stage Six LLC, Julie is building and supporting a portfolio of investment-ready social franchises across a range of sectors and geographies. Her efforts to inform and inspire potential actors in this field have included several high profile speaking engagements and publications.  Julie earned her Masters in Public Health from New York University and her Bachelor of Science from the University of Washington. 

Tags:  replication  scaling  Sector Trends  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  social franchisingsocial entrepreneurship 

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