Print Page   |   Sign In   |   Register
Notes from the Network
Blog Home All Blogs

We are pleased to release the 2018 GroFin Impact Report

Posted By Shailen Neewoor, GroFin, Friday, August 16, 2019

"Famous rock musician and philanthropist Bono once remarked that impact investing is an excuse for good people doing bad deals. We would argue that GroFin is about good people doing real deals. GroFin has invested nearly $340 million in 708 small and growing businesses (SGBs) and in doing so helped them to sustain over 28,000 jobs. These deals might not hit the headlines or generate “alpha returns”, but they do deliver real impact alongside positive financial returns,” Guido Boysen, GroFin CEO.

This year we have changed the format of our annual Impact Report by adopting the Integrated Reporting guidelines. This brings GroFin in-line with global best-practice to report on how we create value by leveraging the various forms of capital at our disposal. This framework enables us to look at the business in an integrated way.

The report provides as an overview of the following:

  • GroFin’s business model and strategy
  • Our biggest accomplishments during the past year
  • The financial performance and impact generated by each of our six active Funds
  • The successes of our clients and how they are changing lives in the communities where they operate.

We are forever grateful to our clients, investors, funders, partners, and staff without whom our success and impact would not have been possible.

Visit the report website

Download the report

 Attached Files:

Tags:  A Access to Finance  Access to Finance  Africa  Agribusiness  Agriculture  ANDE Members  ANTHOS  Base of the Pyramid  Business  Business Models  Calvert Impact Capital  capacity development  CDC  DFID  DGGF  East Africa  education  energy  entrepreneurship  finance  FINFUND  FMO  gender  Global. Development  IFC  impact  impact assessment  impact evaluation  impact investing  impact investing; gender lens investing; gender; w  impact investment  impact management  impact measurement  International Finance Corporation  Investors  Mastercard Foundation  MENA  missing middle  Open Society Foundations - Soros Economic Developm  Philanthropy; impact investing  Scale  SDGs  SGB  SGBs  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  SGBs; small and growing businesses impact investin  SGBs; West Africa; Senegal; Africa; MENA; Entrepre  Shell Foundation  Skoll  small and growing agrobusiness  small and growing businesses impact investing  smes  social impact  Soros Economic Development Fund  South Africa  supply chain  sustainability  sustainable development  Tanzania  Triple Jump  Uganda  USAID  West Africa  Women  World Bank Group  Youth 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Spread the Word: Stanford Seed is Seeking Applicants in Africa & India

Posted By Kendra Gladych, Stanford University, Tuesday, May 7, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Stanford Seed is looking for high-potential CEOs or founders of companies and market-driven social enterprises based in Africa, India and Sri Lanka who are motivated for growth.

The Seed Transformation Program is an unconventional, high-touch learning experience that partners with entrepreneurs in emerging markets to build thriving enterprises that transform lives.

The application deadline is 15 June 2019.

Learn more about the program and access the application here.

Know someone who might be interested? Help us spread the word! Visit this online toolkit for easy ways to share the program with your network.

Tags:  Africa  Agribusiness  Agriculture  ANDE Africa  Business  digital economy  east africa  education  emerging market  emerging markets  energy  entrepreneurship  Fintech  High-Growth Entrepreneurship  India  India; ANDE members  Kenya  leadership  Liberia  professional development  Rwanda  Scale  scaling  smes  social enterprise  Social entrepreneurship  social impact  South Africa  Tanzania  Training  Uganda  West Africa  Women 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

Entrepreneurs Call for Urgent Need to Rethink Asia's Agribusiness

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, November 28, 2018

BANGKOK, November 22, 2018 – What is the business case – the ideal eco-system – for sustainable agriculture and forestry?  Is certification worth the cost? How to feed a growing world as youths leave farming? From Thai social enterprises working with organic rice farmers to one of the world’s largest coffee producers, speakers at Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs’ (ANDE) inaugural lab on sustainable agriculture, held in Bangkok on November 22, brainstormed a new agricultural eco-system to feed a growing world with shrinking natural resources.

“There’s no getting around it: we need more active participants in this evolving ecosystem,” said Angela Hogg, the Environment Office Director of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) office in Asia. “Asia’s food security and environmental protection goals cannot be met without more smallholder producers and businesses adopting more sustainable practices.”

The UN Food and Agriculture Organization estimates smallholder producers supply some 80 percent of the world’s food.

The challenge to transform agriculture is ambitious and the time short, added Hogg, referring to a recent UN report that called for “unprecedented” action to cut carbon emissions.

USAID Green Invest Asia, a facility brokering private sector investments in Asia’s mid-sized sustainable businesses launched by the U.S. Agency for International Development, led the event.  “Current investment is insufficient based on Asia’s projected food needs, alone,” said Christy Owen, the facility’s director. “We need to find a new way to do agribusiness. Urgently.”

DBS, a financial services firm, and the UN Environment Programme have estimated an additional $400 billion is needed between now and 2030 to adequately protect the people, environment and economies of ASEAN countries from the worst effects of climate change and land degradation.

Citibank Foundation, UN Capital Development Fund, the online lending platform Kiva and Asia Development Bank were among the more than 40 attendees.  Kiva’s largest lending sector is agriculture, said Mark McDonagh, its investment manager in the Asia-Pacific region.

While most of Kiva’s loans are micro-loans of $5,000 or less, there is a growing number of larger loans going to social enterprises, mostly in the field of agriculture, said McDonagh. “A flexible agriculture loan isn’t rocket science. The issue is whether an investor has the risk appetite.”

Barriers

Relatively few businesses participate in the sustainable marketplace, with most actors coming from multinational corporations.  In breakout sessions to suggest ways to build a new agricultural economy, access to flexible agriculture loans and breaking into the global green marketplace surfaced as common themes.

The U.S. Government identified this gap when founding the USAID Green Invest Asia facility, which helps sustainable businesses become investment ready and links them to investors interested in the triple bottom line, an accounting framework with three parts: social, environmental and financial.

McDonagh, who helps direct lenders to investments that match their interests, said lenders have always valued innovation in choosing projects to fund.

Solutions

“Farmers are, by nature, hackers,” said Bryan Hugill, co-owner of the Thailand-based social enterprise, Raitong Organics. His 11-year-old farm has 43 ongoing innovation experiments, some in coordination with research labs worldwide, including: biodynamic rice farming where chemical fertilizers are replaced with natural bacteria; microbial fuel cells, or the use of bacteria to drive electric currents; deep-litter pig farming; stingless beekeeping, and cataloguing effective microorganisms.

Additional labs on innovation in agriculture to be organized by ANDE include: lessons learned in agricultural technology with USAID Feed the Future Asia; the role of women as sustainable consumers and investors with ANDE, and agricultural service delivery to smallholder farmers with Syngenta Foundation for Sustainable Agriculture.

Read the original press release here. 

Tags:  Agribusiness  Agriculture  Asia  Learning Lab  USAID 

PermalinkComments (0)
 

The Future of Fresh: Rethinking Our Food Systems at The First Mile of Distribution

Posted By Paula Rodriguez, InspiraFarms, Monday, November 12, 2018
Updated: Monday, November 12, 2018

To all ANDE members, this is a formal invitation to join InspiraFarms side event, The Future of Fresh: Rethinking Our Food Systems at The First Mile of Distribution, the 20th of November, 2018, 6pm. 

We will follow the Financial Times Global Food Systems event with food, drinks and a vivid discussion around challenges and solutions for first-mile distribution, emerging market agribusiness competitiveness and sustainability, and their access to export markets in the UK and beyond.

InspiraFarms CEO, Tim Chambers, will open the event, and welcome our key note speaker Dan Haglund, Senior Private Sector Development Adviser, at the Department for International Development (DFID) who will talk about ‘The role of the private sector in transforming the global food industry into a more sustainable and inclusive system.’

We will present the international joint research project, in partnership with the private sector, DFID and the Shell Foundation, analysing solutions to post-harvest food losses and sharing insights from ongoing field trials.

Julie Hanson, European Director of the Global Cold Chain Alliance, ‘The cold chain industry’s response to the first mile distribution challenge.’

The event will conclude with the debut of a new mini-documentary, ‘The Future of Fresh - rethinking our food systems at the first mile of distribution’.

Join us!!

To register send us an email to inspira@gongcommunications.com 

http://www.inspirafarms.com/the-future-of-fresh-side-event/

Download File (PDF)

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  agribusiness  Agriculture  impact investing 

PermalinkComments (0)