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We are pleased to release the 2018 GroFin Impact Report

Posted By Shailen Neewoor, GroFin, Friday, August 16, 2019

"Famous rock musician and philanthropist Bono once remarked that impact investing is an excuse for good people doing bad deals. We would argue that GroFin is about good people doing real deals. GroFin has invested nearly $340 million in 708 small and growing businesses (SGBs) and in doing so helped them to sustain over 28,000 jobs. These deals might not hit the headlines or generate “alpha returns”, but they do deliver real impact alongside positive financial returns,” Guido Boysen, GroFin CEO.

This year we have changed the format of our annual Impact Report by adopting the Integrated Reporting guidelines. This brings GroFin in-line with global best-practice to report on how we create value by leveraging the various forms of capital at our disposal. This framework enables us to look at the business in an integrated way.

The report provides as an overview of the following:

  • GroFin’s business model and strategy
  • Our biggest accomplishments during the past year
  • The financial performance and impact generated by each of our six active Funds
  • The successes of our clients and how they are changing lives in the communities where they operate.

We are forever grateful to our clients, investors, funders, partners, and staff without whom our success and impact would not have been possible.

Visit the report website

Download the report

 Attached Files:

Tags:  A Access to Finance  Access to Finance  Africa  Agribusiness  Agriculture  ANDE Members  ANTHOS  Base of the Pyramid  Business  Business Models  Calvert Impact Capital  capacity development  CDC  DFID  DGGF  East Africa  education  energy  entrepreneurship  finance  FINFUND  FMO  gender  Global. Development  IFC  impact  impact assessment  impact evaluation  impact investing  impact investing; gender lens investing; gender; w  impact investment  impact management  impact measurement  International Finance Corporation  Investors  Mastercard Foundation  MENA  missing middle  Open Society Foundations - Soros Economic Developm  Philanthropy; impact investing  Scale  SDGs  SGB  SGBs  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  SGBs; small and growing businesses impact investin  SGBs; West Africa; Senegal; Africa; MENA; Entrepre  Shell Foundation  Skoll  small and growing agrobusiness  small and growing businesses impact investing  smes  social impact  Soros Economic Development Fund  South Africa  supply chain  sustainability  sustainable development  Tanzania  Triple Jump  Uganda  USAID  West Africa  Women  World Bank Group  Youth 

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GroFin - Transforming SGBs in Africa & the Middle East

Posted By Shailen Neewoor, GroFin, Wednesday, June 13, 2018
Updated: Friday, June 15, 2018

Gain a deeper understanding of how GroFin, through its unique investment model in SGBs, is positively transforming small and growing businesses and the local communities they support. The inspiring success stories of its entrepreneurs exemplify the collaborative efforts of GroFin staff, investors, partners and clients. The 2017 GroFin Impact Report, Nomou Impact Report and Aspire Impact Report translates its faith in the power of the collective by asking the question “If not us, who? If not today, when? If not with our finance and support, how will these small businesses grow and succeed?”

2017 GroFin Impact Report

As at end 2017, GroFin has financed 675 small and growing businesses, supported 8,840 entrepreneurs, sustained a total of 86,190 jobs and touched the lives of 430,955 family members in the local communities across our 15 locations of operation in Africa and the Middle East. The report indicates that GroFin has made more investments in its priority sectors of education, healthcare, agribusiness, manufacturing and key services. Furthermore, GroFin invested US$ 60M in nearly 88 new small and growing businesses, with over 50% of the SMEs operating directly in our sectors of focus, sustaining 14,000 total jobs and supporting an additional 72,000 livelihoods. And to reinforce its value proposition of providing 'support beyond finance' the company introduced the GroFin STEP (Success through Effective Partnerships) Programme to support its SMEs and Entrepreneurs.

2017 Nomou Impact Report

The Nomou Programme is a regional initiative in MENA which was co-created by GroFin and Shell Foundation. As a result of the collaborative efforts of its investors, partners and clients, the Nomou programme is contributing to the alleviation of poverty and improvement of livelihoods in the communities where the programme operates, as well as striving to reduce the adverse impact of the humanitarian crisis in the region.

In 2017, the Nomou Programme supported 1,005 entrepreneurs, made investments into 103 SGBs, sustained a total of 10,287 jobs, touched the lives of 51,435 beneficiaries and added economic value of US$ 149 million per annum through its investee SMEs across Egypt, Jordan, Iraq and Oman.

2017 Aspire Impact Report

Since their inception in 2014, the Aspire Small Business Fund (ASBF) and the Aspire Growth Fund (AGF) have sought to promote local entrepreneurship, employment and economic value-add in the Niger Delta. With the Shell Petroleum Development Company of Nigeria Limited (SPDC) as anchor investor, the Aspire Enterprise Development Funds epitomise GroFin, a private development finance institution, and SPDC’s efforts to serve the local community with a combination of investment funds, business skills and market linkages.

In 2017 GroFin increased its commitment to supporting SMEs in the Niger Delta Region by investing in an additional 17 small and growing businesses and extending further funding of US$ 2.5M (140% increase from total amount invested as at end 2016). As at end of 2017, GroFin has supported 365 businesses, invested in 53 SMEs and sustained a total of 1,975 jobs under the Aspire Funds.

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Tags:  2017  A Access to Finance  Access to Finance  Africa  Agriculture  ANDE Africa  ANDE Members  Base of the Pyramid  Business  business training  capacity development  DGGF  East Africa  education  finance  impact  impact investing  impact investing; gender lens investing; gender; w  impact investment  impact measurement  innovation  Investors  Kenya  MENA  missing middle  Philanthropy; impact investing  Private sector development  Rwanda  SDGs  SGB  SGBs  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  SGBs; Environment; accelerators; energy  SGBs; West Africa; Senegal; Africa; MENA; Entrepre  small and growing agrobusiness  smes  social impact  South Africa  sustainability  sustainable development  Tanzania  Training  Uganda  West Africa 

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Three Powerful Tools for Fintech Practitioners

Posted By Jane Del Ser, Bankable Frontier Associates, Tuesday, January 16, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018

By David del Ser

(Watch our video)

Since we launched the Catalyst Fund in 2015, we have helped 15 fintech entrepreneurs deploy novel approaches to bring products and services to their customers. We have distilled the successful patterns and behaviors we have observed into toolkits and posts for those considering fintech methods for their businesses, whether they be startups or established players.


At a high level, successful fintech startups adopt principles of Design, Risk Management and Product Management, and also put modern technologies like smartphones, artificial intelligence and cloud computing at the core of their value propositions. At successful fintech startups Designers, Product Managers, CEOs and Engineers reinforce each other in multidisciplinary teams to explore the overlap between what customers find desirable, what engineers can build, and what the business requires to grow.

Design

The function of Design is to represent the voice of the customer at all times to make sure a company stays centered on what matters most. Design is not a one-off process. In the spirit of customer validation, designers keep tight feedback loops with customers throughout the product development process, from early prototypes to usability testing of new features.


Through user research (UX) techniques like online surveys and one-one-one interviews, designers invest heavily during initial stages in order to know their customers like the back of their hand; what are their problems and pain points, and how can their company help? In fact, designers segment customers into personas to allow the team to constantly keep in mind different user profiles and needs.


Aesthetics matter. Designers work hard to perfect a product’s UI and its look and feel, so it can live up to the high expectations created by WhatsApp or Google. But great design goes beyond just user research and visuals during early product design stages. Successful inclusive fintech startups map out the Customer Journey and Service Blueprint in detail to fully understand the perspective of the user each time they  interact with the company.


Ultimately, great design creates trust, that elusive quality that all startups are chasing and that distinguishes them from their competitors. We’ve captured our lessons for startups to build trust with their customers through their products or services in our Design for Trust Toolkit.


Product Management

But designers can’t work in isolation; they need someone to lead the orchestra - and that’s where a product manager comes in. The PM takes a big picture view and works to ensure that designers, engineers and marketers all work towards the same goal. Crucially, she makes sure the product or service goal is backed by data and evidence. She keeps the whole process nimble through quick agile iterations focused on the activities of users, from initial onboarding to the retention phase. For example, using A/B Testing and usage analytics she captures details of how each users is interacting with every screen to inform engagement.


The effective product manager is very focused on the key metrics for the business, such as customer lifetime value or acquisition costs. She also works hard to explore the best channels to find new customers, including viral referrals and social media. As an example, our portfolio company Destacame has seen lead acquisition costs dropping to less than $3 through these types of digital channels. We explore some of the different tools and frameworks to help startups focus as they chart their journey from idea, to minimum viable product (MVP) and growth in our upcoming product/market fit toolkit.

Modern Technologies

And finally, you can’t have good fintech without the “tech” that is enabling these new approaches.


Most important are the smartphones, which run fintech apps and also act as channels to find and interact with users. For instance, several of our startups use WhatsApp to offer customer support and drive virality, communicating with users in the way they prefer. Smartphones can also be used to generate and capture user data, which is particularly valuable when targeting low-income consumers who traditionally have been anonymous. In that vein, our portfolio company Smile Identity validates and authenticates customer identities using selfies taken on their phones.


In addition machine learning and other artificial intelligence systems can improve customer value propositions and to automate internal processes like credit scoring using data from smartphones and other new sources like satellites. As an example, our portfolio company ToGarantido is exploring chatbots for sales of their insurance policies and customer support. Harvesting is using satellite data to understand credit and insurance risk with just a GPS read. Worldcover doesn’t even need customers to file a claim as their satellite systems award them automatically.


And software engineering helped Escala and Paygo Energy to automate most of their back-office processes to be responsive to their customers. It is easier and more affordable than ever for startups to leverage affordable SaaS solutions to architect their systems. Likewise, cloud computing is also a powerful technology that offers simplicity, lower costs and flexibility. There is no need to commit capital to purchase hardware and the team requires less engineering talent to keep the servers going.

Conclusion

In our experience, companies that harness the powerful combination of design, product management and modern technologies create better and more tailored value propositions. That makes for happier customers, which is what makes businesses thrive. By driving more usage, the fintech triad can create more impact in low-income populations. And digital channels and automated processes can significantly lower costs of serving customers, allowing for expansion to new markets and reducing exclusion.


Learn more by joining us for our webinar on the Catalyst Fund toolkits during the ANDE Sector Update call in January. Register here.


Tags:  Acceleration  accelerator  accelerators  Africa  ANDE Africa  Base of the Pyramid  brazil  Business Models  capacity development  early stage ecosystem  emerging markets  entrepreneurship  finance  financial inclusion  fintech  Grants Rockefeller  impact investing  impact investment  inclusive innovation  India  India; ANDE members  innovation  Kenya  Latin America  mentoring  Mexico  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  smaholder farmers  smes  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  social innovation  webinar  West Africa 

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GroFin opens 16th office across Africa and MENA, to invest in SMEs in Senegal

Posted By Nishika Bajaj, GroFin, Thursday, December 14, 2017

GroFin, a pioneering SME development financier, has opened its 16th office in Senegal, furthering its expansion into West Africa’s Francophone belt after Ivory Coast.

With the opening of this office, Senegalese entrepreneurs can expect to benefit from the unique model of appropriate, medium-term finance and specialised, value-added business support that GroFin extends to Small and Growing Businesses (SGBs) across its locations of operation.

Headquartered in Mauritius, GroFin currently has an investment footprint in 14 countries across Africa and the Middle East – straddling key economies in Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Southern Africa and the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region – with one to two countries expected to be added each year.

GroFin’s latest in-country expansion heralds a new investment horizon for its flagship Small and Growing Businesses Fund (SGB Fund). Launched in September 2014 across nine African countries, the Fund has capital commitments of USD 100 million, making it one of the largest funds specifically targeting SGBs in Africa.

The SGB Fund follows on the fully invested GroFin Africa Fund, marking 13 years during which GroFin has supported over 8,500 entrepreneurs and invested in 640 SGBs, as well as sustained 104,950 jobs, benefitted 524,770 livelihoods and added economic value exceeding USD 700 m per annum through its investees, as at 30th June 2017.

With an evergreen structure, the SGB Fund was created by GroFin together with the Shell Foundation, an independent charity; the German Development Bank, KfW; the Norwegian Investment Fund for Developing Countries, Norfund; and the Dutch government through the Dutch Good Growth Fund (DGGF). 

Tags:  Base of the Pyramid  SGBs; West Africa; Senegal; Africa; MENA; Entrepre 

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Announcing the Third Call for Applications for the CHMI Learning Exchange!

Posted By Allison Ettenger, Results for Development Institute, Wednesday, October 12, 2016

applICATIONS OPEN FOR the CHMI Learning Exchange

 

The Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI), in partnership with Solina Health, is thrilled to announce its third Call for Applications for the CHMI Learning Exchange! Applications are due by November 13th.

Download the application here

Recognizing the excellence and innovation within our global network, the CHMI Learning Exchange aims to facilitate structured learning partnerships between organizations that are profiled on CHMI, helping programs to improve business practices, adopt innovations, or scale-up or replicate an aspect of their model to a new market. Learning Exchanges help connect health program managers to their peers for a focused opportunity that can help organizations strengthen their health businesses, and expand access to improved quality care.

The CHMI Learning Exchange will provide funding of up to US $8,000 to successful applicants to facilitate learning partnerships. Programs that apply for participation in the Learning Exchange may also be considered for participation in a Learning Collaborative - an additional in-person opportunity to work with your learning exchange partner and other programs in our network that share similar programmatic challenges[1].  To be eligible for this opportunity, at least one program must be based in West Africa[2], and both programs must be based in Sub-Saharan Africa

CHMI has seen firsthand that peer learning activities can be a valuable tool to support programs on their path to scale, ultimately reaching more people with quality, affordable care. In April 2015, CHMI awarded its second round of learning exchange grants to five winning applications. Representing ten organizations and six countries, these new partnerships allowed program managers to improve and scale-up their models; past grantee activities range from replicating supply models, improving management and operational processes, building financial sustainability, and adapting new client safety systems.

A Learning Exchange Focused on Sub-Saharan Africa


Following the 2014 West Africa Ebola outbreak, the global community refocused its attention on the fragmented health systems in West Africa. While many activities are implemented in West Africa with government support, there is a limited presence of peer learning opportunities in the region for private providers.  Allowing innovators from across the continent to connect with West African programs helps CHMI to share tacit knowledge, understand country contexts and regional trends, and promote South-to-South learning partnerships.

Is this opportunity right for me?

-Are you a healthcare manager running a program in Sub-Saharan Africa, aspiring to scale up your program or enter new markets?

-Are you struggling with a central question around your business model, one that other program managers may have insight into?

-Could you benefit from traveling or engaging virtually to learn from a similar healthcare program, either in your country or internationally?


If you answered yes to any of the above, the CHMI Learning Exchange may be a good opportunity for you!

What is a Learning Exchange?

A Learning Exchange is an engagement between two or more organizations to share knowledge around a particular need or business practice. Partners may be based in the same geography or in different countries.

Because peer-to-peer exchanges are customized to address an organization’s particular and current need, they can be limited to the scope necessary to catalyze institutional change. 

How does a Learning Exchange work?


Learning Exchanges will involve one or more healthcare organizations acting as lead partners and knowledge partners. One of these partners must be based in West Africa, and both programs need to be based in Sub-Saharan Africa

Lead partner: A “lead partner” is a healthcare organization profiled by CHMI that will develop the application for the CHMI Learning Exchange and be responsible for disbursing funds to other partnering organizations. The “lead” partner can be the “learner” in a traditional “mentor-mentee” relationship; or, the lead partner and knowledge partners can represent similar organizations that may offer complementary skills, expertise, and ability to learn from one another. Lead partners should contact potential knowledge partners through CHMI or through other channels to solicit their agreement to apply for the CHMI Learning Exchange. Please contact chmi@r4d.org if you require assistance in contacting programs through our website.Knowledge partner: One or more healthcare organization(s) that work with a lead partner to exchange knowledge through activities specified in this application. Knowledge partner(s) should agree to participate with a lead partner prior to being named in an application for the CHMI Learning Exchange.

 
Both partners should discuss the scope of the learning agenda, the way in which learning will take place, and its intended impact.

The lead partner will submit an application to the CHMI Learning Exchange. The lead partner will assume responsibility for meeting outcomes, submitting reports, and determining whether and how funds are shared between partners. The knowledge partner will provide their organization’s commitment signature on the Lead partner’s application.


A cohort of organizations will carry out their unique Learning Exchanges over a six-month period, from December 2016 through May 2017. At the conclusion of the Learning Exchange, partners will reflect on what worked and what didn’t work, and share their experiences to benefit the broader CHMI community. 

 
Learn more and apply by November 13th. Please contact us at chmilearningexchange@r4d.org if you have any questions. We look forward to hearing from you! 

Apply today

Tags:  Base of the Pyramid  business training  Health  Private Sector  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  Training & Events  West Africa 

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Partnerships to impact low-income markets in Kenya and East Africa

Posted By Chandrakant Komaragiri, Ennovent, Friday, June 3, 2016
Updated: Friday, June 3, 2016

Ennovent is seeking partners who work in sectors including Education, Healthcare, Agri-business, Finance, WASH,  Energy and others, who are interested in collaborating on business opportunities in Kenya. Partners can be individuals and organisations including consultants, development agencies, foundations, investors and corporations.


Benefits for partners will include the opportunity to collaborate with a diversified network, develop and implement innovation projects to address business opportunities, and build on knowledge and expertise on pertinent issues.


If you are interested in partnering with Ennovent, please fill out this short form, and we will be in touch with you.


We would also like to request you to share this exciting partnership opportunity widely in your network and help in making a sustainable impact in Kenya together.

Tags:  Africa  Agriculture  Base of the Pyramid  Creating Shared Value  East Africa  entrepreneurship ecosystems  inclusive innovation  Kenya  Private sector development  social innovation  sustainability  sustainable development 

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Career Accelerator: Social Innovation Management Fellowship - Call for Applications

Posted By Geraldine Hepp, Amani Institute, Monday, December 14, 2015
Updated: Monday, December 14, 2015

Change someone's life - share this opportunity for aspiring changemakers to join a global Fellowship and take their career to the next level! 

We have received some of our best applicants thanks to people like you, and we would love to see the power of our community once again - so we can find the changemakers who are looking to build the professional skills and global networks needed to lead change effectively.

You can learn more about our Post-Graduate Certificate in Social Innovation Management and its changed structure here
Amani Institute Graduates now have an exciting opportunity through our partnership with Lynn University, where our program counts 25% towards a new MBA in Social Innovation Management that can be completed both on campus or online.

The most effective way to share this is via direct 
recommendation and shouldn't take longer than 3 minutes of your time but could mean a life-changing opportunity for someone in your network.

Fellows who have benefitted most from this program have been:

  • Career-switchers
  • Recent Graduates
  • Social change sector professionals 

committed to taking their work to the next level. Selection criteria:

  • A University degree (undergrad or masters)
  • At least two years of practical experience (either working or volunteering)
  • Evidence of commitment to social change through your personal and/or professional life
  • Strong desire to develop yourself further both professionally and personally
  • Interest in gaining a further global perspective to your previous experiences

Find a sample text, an infographic and a video for you to pass on below but also feel free to directly nominate and connect us via Email, allowing for a no-strings attached conversation with someone you nominate as a potential Social Innovation Management Fellow

_____________________________________________________________________
Feel free to use the below infographic about the different phases of the program and the following sample text for easy sharing:

Dear [Name],

Considering your passion for meaningful work, I highly recommend Amani Institute'scutting-edge 10 month Post-Graduate Certificate in Social Innovation Management: 4 months field immersion in Kenya or Brazil, 10 professional skill-building courses taught by global experts, a customized apprenticeship, 3 inspiring field trips, 20+ like-minded classmates from around the world, and much more. 

In 10 months, expand your professional network, get global experience in how to tackle some of the toughest challenges, and learn how to change the world! Apply now: bit.ly/amani2016

Learn more about Amani Institute's partnership with Lynn University if you are interested in an MBA in Social Innovation Management herebit.ly/SocInnMBA

Application Deadline: January 11th, 2016
Program start: February 1st, 2016

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Tags:  Base of the Pyramid  business training  capacity development  career in social changeSocial Entrepreneurship  CSR  diaspora  East Africa  education  emerging markets  fellowship  impact evaluation  innovation  Latin America  social entrepreneurship  social innovation  talent 

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Mobile Movies and BoP Innovation Center help boost sales volumes in Bangladesh

Posted By Irmgard Jansen, BoP Innovation Center, Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Entertainment and education make an excellent couple, particularly in areas where penetration rates of modern media are low and illiteracy is high. Just compare it with the use of computer games for education.

The social enterprise Mobile Movies has built upon this insight and applies the combination of entertainment and education in rural areas of, for example, Bangladesh. The enterprise organizes networks of agents that bring together people in rural communities to watch entertaining films followed by information on products and services.

Within the PROOFS project we work with Mobile Movies to introduce beneficial nutrition and hygiene products, to collect data on nutrition habits and to document the impact of this collaboration. In 2 districts in Bangladesh, Rangpur and Barisal, PROOFS partnered with Mobile Movies and trained 6 Nutrition Sales Agents (NSAs). Each agent receives a light-weight, portable and durable Mobile Movies Kit, including video and data collection equipment as well as a smartphone.

Five nights per week they invite communities for an event with entertaining film clips and TV shows. The popular gatherings are being used to introduce and demonstrate products such as food supplements.

“Previously I was facing difficulties to ensure participation in nutrition sessions, but now I am conducting nutrition sessions through Mobile Movies the targeted households are willingly attending to see the videos and are learning with enjoyment.”
- Rahena Begum, one of the agents trained by PROOFS

On average 55 people attend the social evenings and for the afternoon events even over 100 people show up. When they are not caught up in events, the agents walk around in the villages and collect information on points of sale for certain products and assess brand and benefit awareness in the communities. They conduct surveys to document community behavior change over time.

In PROOFS we were already cooperating with 160 NSAs. They earn their living by selling nutritious products in local communities. With the introduction of Mobile Movies additional demand is being created for the product offer of the NSAs. After the Mobile Movies community activities started, the NSAs saw their sales volumes increase by 267% for ORS packets, 258% for Zinc tablets and a staggering 312% for sanitary napkins! Sales volumes may decrease a little after some time, but will probably stabilize at much higher levels than before.

“Mobile Movies is a good way to learn about nutrition issues through amusement. I have not seen these types of videos before. Previously I was bored when I attended the nutrition sessions, but I have learned so many nutrition messages through the video shows. Now my trust in the nutritious products and messages has increased.”
- Moina Begum, one of the participants in Mobile Movies 


The Mobile Movies approach offers great opportunities within PROOFS and in many other rural markets with more or less the same conditions as those in Bangladesh. The vast majority of consumers in those areas do not have access to TV or computers, yet they represent emerging markets with aspiring consumers. Just imagine the impressive number of people that can be reached through this innovative channel. And just imagine how many people will learn about the advantages of consuming healthy food and a healthy lifestyle. Mobile Movies is more than a portable cinema. It is a mobile and flexible advertising agency that can help enterprises reach markets that could hardly be reached before. Within PROOFS we have recognized Mobile Movies’ value and impact and we believe that many companies will follow.

Tags:  Bangladesh  Base of the Pyramid  BoPInc  emerging markets  Food  inclusive business  innovation  Mobile Movies  Social Entrepreneurship  social impact  Southeast Asia 

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Learning from What Works: IFC's New Report on Inclusive Business

Posted By Kathleen Mignano, International Finance Corporation, Thursday, November 20, 2014

 

The success of local businesses is often lost in the discussion of ‘BOP business’ or ‘inclusive business.’  While case studies abound on many of the well-known multi-nationals trying to break into these markets, why are we not learning more from companies that are already succeeding with the Base of the Pyramid? 

 

In the past 10 years, IFC has committed over US$11 billion to more than 400 companies with inclusive business models that reach the BOP. These are companies that are doing commercial business with the BOP.  They span 90 countries and a variety of sectors, including agribusiness, education, health, utilities, information and communication technology, financial markets, and housing. In 2013, the inclusive businesses in IFC’s portfolio reached over 90 million people, including farmers, students, patients, utility customers, and micro borrowers.

 

IFC’s inclusive business clients are generally not multinational companies, but rather medium to large local companies, or sometimes, the multinationals’ local subsidiaries. Many of them are not new to BOP markets.  In fact, most have been at it for a long time. 

 

Our latest report Shared Prosperity through Inclusive Business: How Successful Companies Reach the Base of the Pyramid summarizes the practical lessons that we can learn from IFC clients that successfully reach these low-income people as suppliers or customers. We analyzed our portfolio of clients, looking for the common factors that enable these companies to reach the base of the pyramid.  There are lessons for each phase of the value chain—including procurement, product development, distribution and retail, and marketing and sales. The lessons—each of them illustrated with a profile of an IFC client—can also be adapted to the context of a particular sector or region. 

 

We believe that the lessons we can learn from these companies -- many of which aren’t as familiar to those in the development community -- could prove extremely valuable for those companies that are still trying to find success with the BOP.  To many local companies, these lessons may seem like a normal part of doing business, but to others, they may be the missing piece to their business model. 

 

The report addresses four common challenges that companies face when engaging the BOP:

1. Sourcing from smallholder farmers

2. Appealing to value conscious consumers

3. Maximizing access while reducing cost

4. Unlocking ability and willingness to pay

 

Among the 22 companies mentioned in the report is Ideal Invest, the largest private student lender in Brazil. The company came up with an alternative way to price its Pravaler loan. The student is responsible for only the principal amount, while the partner universities cover the interest portion—thereby making the loan more affordable for low-income students.

 

Also included in the report is a profile of Kenya Tea Development Agency (KTDA), one of the largest tea companies in the world. In order to source from smallholder tea farmers, KTDA offers comprehensive services including training, provision of inputs, transportation, processing, marketing, and access to finance. These techniques allow KTDA to expand and diversify its supply base and offer locally-sourced quality tea, while at the same time, improving the incomes of its suppliers.

 

There is no one magic combination of these solutions that will work for every business, nor is the combination of solutions static over time.  Once a company has built these solutions into its business model, it is imperative to continue refining them to find the most effective combination. 

 

As a member of the World Bank Group, our goals are to end poverty and to boost shared prosperity. We believe that inclusive businesses are a valuable piece of the puzzle to help us get there.

  

To download a copy of the report, click here.

 

For more information on inclusive business at IFC, visit www.ifc.org/inclusivebusiness

Tags:  Base of the Pyramid  Business Models  IFC  inclusive business  Prosperity 

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