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AV Ventures' Investments Catalyze Ghana Poultry Industry

Posted By Heather Bateman, ACDI/VOCA, Tuesday, June 4, 2019

AV Ventures is pleased to announce two new investments in Ghana: G. I. Nyame Aye Awie Ampa Limited (GINAAAL) and Golden Link Savings and Loans Limited. AV Ventures, a subsidiary of ACDI/VOCA, is an impact investor providing mezzanine and revenue-based debt to small and growing businesses (SGBs) in developing countries. AV Ventures promotes markets in which business owners, smallholder farmers, and communities are empowered to succeed in the global economy. 

AV Ventures has partnered with the ongoing USDA-funded Ghana Poultry Project, implemented by ACDI/VOCA, and collaborates closely on pre- and post-investment support, poultry market systems development, and fostering other private and public local partnerships.

New Investments, Expanded Impact

The first of AV Ventures’ new investments is GINAAAL, a commercial poultry farm producing eggs for the Ghanaian market. Urbanization, rising per-capita income, and an increasing population are driving significant increases in the demand for chicken meat and table eggs in Ghana where demand outpaces domestic supply—creating opportunities for local poultry farms to expand and fill this gap. AV Ventures’ investment will allow GINAAAL to increase its capacity by bringing an estimated 7 million more eggs to market annually. The investment is also expected to generate greater economic and social impact through:

-  Increasing employment by an estimated 20 percent
-  Improving incomes of its egg retailer network, over 90 percent of whom are women
-  Providing access to markets for over 900 smallholder soy and maize farmers in Ghana, from whom GINAAAL sources its feed ingredients

Further, AV Ventures’ revenue-based financing helps to pioneer a new approach to SME finance: by sharing risk with the entrepreneur and tying repayments to success of the company’s future sales, while allowing the entrepreneur to retain full ownership.

“AV Ventures sees enormous potential for agriculture sector growth in Ghana, particularly in its growing poultry industry. Given its importance in rural Ghana, there is huge potential to catalyze inclusive growth by investing in this sector,” said Geoffrey Chalmers, Managing Director of AV Ventures LLC. 

Golden Link Savings and Loans, AV Ventures’ second new investment, is licensed by the Bank of Ghana as a specialized deposit-taking institution, offering savings, loans, checking, deposit, mobile banking, and remittance services to its customers – many of whom operate in the informal economy. Golden Link has developed loan products specifically for poultry value chain businesses. AV Ventures’ investment creates an on-lending facility for Golden Link to significantly expand its poultry loan portfolio, thereby improving access to finance to smallholder poultry farmers, informal entrepreneurs, and micro-enterprises in Ghana’s poultry value chain. Providing the financing in local currency allows Golden Link to expand without foreign currency risk.

“[AV Ventures’] support is already acting as a catalyst for our growth to the next level,” stated Dr. Emmanuel Owusu, Managing Director of Golden Link.

More About AV Ventures

As a subsidiary of ACDI/VOCA, AV Ventures leverages ACDI/VOCA’s broad platform of expertise and services, including:

-  A global network of 1,200+ staff implementing market systems development programming in 20+ countries
-  Technical expertise in agriculture, financial services, business growth, gender, youth, and more
-  Strong partnerships with local governments, funders, local communities & customer bases, and other international and local private companies
-  Pre- and post-investment advisory support, drawing from our global networks

AV Ventures and ACDI/VOCA are proud members of the Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs (ANDE), Convergence, the INGOs in Impact Investing Network, and the USAID INVEST Network

For more details about AV Ventures or these recent investments, please contact Geoffrey Chalmers, Managing Director for AV Ventures, at gchalmers@av-ventures.com

Tags:  Africa  Agriculture  entrepreneurship  finance  impact investing  impact investment  innovative finance  NGOs  SGBs; small and growing businesses impact investin  smallholder farmers  smes  West Africa 

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Accion invests in CÍVICO to accelerate access to innovative financial services in Latin America

Posted By Lisa Johnson, Accion, Wednesday, April 10, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 10, 2019

Bogotá, Colombia, April 3, 2019 — Global nonprofit Accion announced today an investment in Latin American digital platform CÍVICO. The funds will help CÍVICO invest in technology and analytics, expand its merchant network, and develop its suite of financial services.

CÍVICO is a digital platform that enables access to information and services to improve the quality of life of individuals in Latin America. The company provides micro, small, and medium enterprises (MSMEs) in Bogotá, Colombia; Mexico City, Mexico; and Santiago, Chile with a platform to connect with local customers as well as business information and payment services. CÍVICO also provides a strong value proposition to its merchants with electronic payments, e-commerce, business education in digital marketing techniques, coupons and loyalty programs, as well as better bookkeeping techniques. Today, CÍVICO has more than 600,000 registered merchants and helps serve more than 4 million consumers.

“We’re excited to bring on Accion as our newest partner. With its decades of experience supporting financial services innovation in Latin America and around the world, we know Accion’s investment and advisory support will be critical as we scale our services and reach in the region,” said Ricardo Pombo, CEO and Co-founder of CÍVICO.

"Latin American entrepreneurs often lack access to formal financial services and adequate business training. Through its simple, digital platform, CÍVICO is closing this gap and helping small businesses thrive," said Michael Schlein, President and CEO of Accion. “Accion is excited to bring our global expertise to CÍVICO’s experienced management team and help leverage its innovative technology platform to scale financial services in the region,” said Radhika Shroff, Deputy Chief Investment Officer of Accion Global Investments.

As part of its merchant customer acquisition strategy, CÍVICO uses an innovative crowdsourcing model to identify and confirm MSME information, including the business’ names, contact information, hours, and services. This information, along with merchants’ and users’ data, helps CÍVICO learn more about the MSMEs it serves, connect them with local customers, and develop deeper profiles that can be used to better understand community needs and ultimately provide entrepreneurs with tailored financial services. The company also partners with large financial service providers to help entrepreneurs access the electronic payment systems they need to accept credit and debit cards, allowing them to increase sales.

In addition to financial support, Accion is providing advisory services to enable CÍVICO to reach more clients throughout Colombia, Mexico, and Chile. The advisory services will support the company as it further develops its financial services distribution and enables more merchants to access quality digital services.

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About Accion

Accion is a global nonprofit committed to creating a financially inclusive world, with a pioneering legacy in microfinance and fintech impact investing. We catalyze financial service providers to deliver high-quality, affordable solutions at scale for the three billion people who are left out of — or poorly served by — the financial sector. For more than 50 years, Accion has helped tens of millions of people through our work with more than 110 partners in 50 countries. More at http://www.accion.org>.

 

Link to associated blog: https://www.accion.org/how-one-platform-connects-cities-and-boosts-small-businesses/

Tags:  communities  digital economy  emerging markets  financial inclusion  impact investing  innovative finance 

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Beyond Traditional Gender Lens Investing: An Intersectional Approach

Posted By Melissa Benn, The Foundation for a Smoke-Free World, Thursday, April 4, 2019
Updated: Thursday, April 4, 2019

By Melissa Benn, Senior Program Analyst, and Alexandra Solomon, Senior Research Analyst for Ethics and Human Rights 


Gender Lens Investing: “The deliberate integration of gender analysis into investment analysis and decision-making

Gender lens investing (GLI) is “an investing approach that deliberately incorporates a desire to make a difference in the lives of women and girls, while meeting the risk/return objectives appropriate for an institutional portfolio.” The Criterion Institute and Jackie VanderBrug, Managing Director of Global Wealth Management at Bank of America, developed a comprehensive gender lens investing framework, defining, disaggregating, and evaluating the ways in which various investments can benefit and empower women.

Overall, GLI can include, but is not limited to, investments along the following three pillars: (i) Increasing access to capital for women, (ii) workplace equity for women, (iii) products and services for women.

Source: Investor toolkit with a focus on girls and young women. SPRING Accelerator, October 2018. Page 14.

Intersectionality: The interconnected nature of social categorizations, such as race, class, gender, and sexuality, and how they overlap to create interdependent systems of disadvantage and discrimination

In development contexts, women are often considered to be a singular unified cohort that can be grouped together and served based solely on their gender. However, women are not a monolith. This overly simplistic classification interferes with the development community’s ability to serve the most vulnerable populations of women. Intersectionality broadens the concept of “women” and brings visibility to women with differential identities.

Because different groups have different needs, one must pay explicit attention to, and create, programs and solutions focused on different categorizations of women. Such solutions and programs may include, but are not limited to: race, ethnicity, income level, food security, income security, education level, location, financial literacy, access to information, land ownership and access, number of children and/or dependents in the household, disease burden, and marital status. Accounting for these factors would create a truly intersectional and impactful venture fund that does not overlook or exclude women with varying degrees of vulnerability.

How do we best address intersectionality to ensure the three above-mentioned pillars of GLI are inclusive?

 

Increasing access to capital for women

At the US Chamber of Commerce’s International Women’s Day Forum, Jamie Sears, Executive Director of Americas UBS Community Affairs & Corporate Responsibility, spoke about the “myth of meritocracy in the entrepreneur space” and how “discrimination is structural and persistent.” According to the World Bank, 70% of formal women-owned small- and medium-sized enterprises in developing countries are either excluded by financial institutions or are unable to access financial services that meet their needs, resulting in a $287 billion gender funding gap annually. As investors rethink their impact and more purposefully direct capital flows, they have the opportunity to work with development actors to promote not only economic change and empowerment, but also the ability to address the accompanying shifts in attitudes, policies, and practices required to result in sustainable system change.

 

Workplace equity for women: Promoting gender equity throughout the value chain

Understanding how value chains are embedded in the social context that defines differential roles, opportunities, and barriers to success is essential to maximize efficiency, productivity, and profitability. Gender-blind and need-blind investments risk exacerbating gender inequities, failing to identify opportunities for economic growth, and widening the looming gender funding gap and gender agricultural productivity gap, which stands at an estimated 30% in Malawi. A purposeful focus on gender and other intersectional dynamics sheds light on the otherwise invisible relative disadvantages that all kinds of women face and can inform investment strategies in new or improved value chains.

Similarly, many development actors focus on microfinance as the silver bullet to women’s economic empowerment. However, by focusing on microfinance within spheres already in women’s limited areas of control (ie, market vending, textiles, etc), it is easy to overlook the root causes of inequities and not address larger systems built on patriarchal norms – such as politics, health care, and education – that exploit women and perpetuate their lack of adequate representation.

Further up the value chain, we see a growing body of evidence has linked gender diversity to measures of better performance, including return on invested capital (ROIC), return on equity (ROE), and ROE volatility. While this evidence highlights ROI for women’s representation and the damaging nature of gender-blind investments, more research is needed to parse out the different identities of women, such as women of color, women of varying income levels, LGBT people, and women living in the Global South.

 

Products and services for women

Very few companies directly address the needs of women, let alone the needs of women in the Global South. Jackie VanderBrug draws attention to the need for products that address the challenges that women face and how innovation has been gender-blind in many ways to date. In agriculture, for example, technology is “necessarily filtered through the gendered patterns of agricultural labour, household enterprises, family food consumption decisions and social structures.”

According to the SPRING Accelerator Investor Toolkit, “girls and young women do not need to be the direct end users to be impacted by a business’s products and services.” Investors can focus on ecosystems and specific industries, such as EdTech, that benefit and accelerate the success of women.

 

Foundation for a Smoke-Free World’s Agricultural Transformation Initiative in Malawi

If the work of the Foundation and the work of the development community is to address the needs of the most marginalized peoples, we must strive to define inclusion beyond gender. While women continue to be underserved and underutilized along the value chain, we have the ability to think deeper and to address the many layered issues that the most marginalized women in the world face.

The Agricultural Transformation Initiative’s (ATI) Investment Support Facility (ISF) in Malawi is focused on integrating smallholders into investor-grade transactions. All transactions in the pipeline must include women in a substantial way, integrate significant numbers of smallholder farmers into their business models, and demonstrate meaningful income and productivity increases for smallholders. We seek to answer the question: What does it mean to truly and materially integrate and include all women?

If you have ideas for helping to ensure the ISF is an intersectional investment fund, please comment below! We are always looking for new ideas to ensure we support the most vulnerable communities in Malawi and are eager to have you be part of the conversation.

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Tags:  Africa  capacity development  entrepreneurship  impact investing  Malawi  Women  women's economic empowerment 

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Working with investors to develop proactive talent strategies

Posted By Rebecca Harrison, African Management Initiative, Thursday, March 21, 2019

Working with investors to develop proactive talent strategies 

Human capital is a key challenge for many SGBs. Getting and keeping the right team in place is critical to propel ventures to scale – yet founding teams often struggle to find the right fit. Many investors in African companies have tolAMI they want to focus more post-investment support on developing talent within their investee companies. But they often aren’t sure how to develop a talent strategy that cuts across their investment portfolio.

AMI hosted a roundtable discussion in Nairobi last month for around 30 early and growth stage investors into East Africa interested in adopting more proactive talent strategies for their portfolio companies. We shared 3 models we’ve seen used to provide post-investment human capital support, and hosted a candid discussion around what is and isn’t working.

AMI identified the following three broad buckets for ways to engage around talent at a portfolio company level. We heard from various investors, who shared how they are using different approaches to help their investee companies build out the teams they need to scale.

Three models:

Facilitative model   This could also be described as the ‘matchmaking’ model. The facilitative model is used when investors help companies understand their talent needs, identify and introduce them to quality providers, and then show them how to engage. The investor’s role here is primarily diagnostic and facilitative, and aims to support needs that are specific to each founding teams/organisation. Some investors are using TA funds to finance these interventions.

Examples: For AHL Ventures, talent is one of the main post-investment challenges that companies across their portfolio face. They often work with their companies on creating a talent plan or helping them directly acquire talent. They also refer investee companies to talent providers, where appropriate, using experience on what has worked with other portfolio companies to inform recommendations. For example, AMI has worked with AHL to train employees in several of their investee companies, including MKOPAPowerGenEthioChicken and Equity for Tanzania.

A different approach within the facilitative model was shared by CDC Groupwhich is developing an online directory for investee companies providing information on different human capital services available, including services specific to talent development – training, recruiting etc. CDC aims to make this directory available more broadly with the goal of also building the broader ecosystem (see supply-side model below).

Direct model The direct model differs from the facilitative model, as it works to identify a very clear need across the investor’s portfolio, instead of working on a case-by-case basis. This model is focused on solving a specific challenge, for example developing middle managers, hiring CFOs or working on enterprise sales. The goal is to offer a structured programme or intervention that cuts across the entire portfolio. This approach is becoming increasingly popular as investors deepen their understanding around critical talent challenges, and is often funded by a blend of investor/TA subsidy and direct payment by the company.

Examples: Acumen identified a need across its portfolio to strengthen middle management skills and build leadership bench strength below the executive team. They first partnered with AMI 3 years ago to develop cross-portfolio programmes for both middle and senior managers and now run at least one programme annually. Interestingly, Acumen started by subsidising the programmes significantly, but has gradually phased this out. Companies now pay directly, and many have worked this into their annual planning and budgeting processes.

Shell Foundation took a similarly direct approach, offering AMI management programmes to companies across its portfolio on a cost share basis, after identifying management skills as a cross-cutting need. In this case, Shell Foundation allowed companies to engage AMI on their own terms, but provided the cost-share to make this possible. More than 100 have continued to work with AMI on a fully commercial basis, demonstrating that investors can often play a catalytic role in demonstrating the value of human capital services to companies.

Finally, Investisseurs & Partenaires (I&P) hosts a pan-African entrepreneurship club for its portfolio companies, where portfolio companies are invited to exchange ideas and debate on various issues including recruitment and retention. I&P also hosts seminars on specific topics of interest to entrepreneurs.

Supply-side support A small and growing group of investors are working to strengthen the ecosystem of human capital providers itself, either through grants and investments into supply-side players, or through experimentation with innovative sector-building models.

Examples: Shell Foundation is working with Argidius Foundation and Bluehaven to develop a Talent Facility to encourage and enable early-stage enterprises to invest in talent even when cash is constrained. Bluehaven, AHL and I&P have all invested directly into human capital providers such as AMI and Shortlist. And both Bluehaven and Argidius Foundation have provided grants to build the talent ecosystem more broadly.

Top learnings from investors:

Each of the 30 investors in attendance have several years of experience working in the impact investment sector in East Africa and globally, and shared openly about what they’ve learned around human capital. Here are a few high-level learnings

    • Investors can and should influence, and even incentivise, founding teams to focus on talent. Investors noted that founders themselves needed to be bought into human capital as a strategic priority. Investors can make their expectations clear in this regard, both before investment during diue diligence and after investment, at a board level.
    • Human capital is a core strategic priority not a ‘nice to have’ – is it on the agenda at board meetings? Many companies and investors agree that talent is important, but then spend their board meetings talking about fund-raising and sales targets. Investors who sit on boards can push talent issues up the agenda by asking the right questions around talent strategy.
    • Proactive talent strategy is more effective than reactive crisis management: Investors have seen talent challenges emerge when companies grow very quickly. Investors can encourage companies to get the right human capital systems and structures in place ahead of (or at least at the beginning) of a period of aggressive growth, and can share lessons learned from other portfolio companies.
    • Investors have seen key needs cut across portfolio companies. Some key themes emerged from the discussion – for the example the need to develop middle management, the shortage of strong CFO candidates and challenges with enterprise sales. However investors working at different stages of the investment cycle noted that different approaches are required for early-stage businesses versus more mature companies. Investors can benefit from sharing notes with others investing at a similar stage.
    • Due diligence should include a structured focus on management capacity & learning mindset. Many investors are being more intentional and structured about probing the management capacity of founding teams and their broader leadership. Some noted the importance of ensuring that entrepreneurs themselves have a learning mindset, and so are likely to build a learning culture across the organisation.
    • Start with simple interventions that work – A quick and easy way to start leveraging your experience as an investor to drive talent development is to introduce functional heads from within your own portfolio to each other. For example, introducing the head of marketing from two of your investee companies to each other is extremely beneficial for growth, learning and innovation.

We’d love to hear from any investors who have tried approaches not listed here. What’s worked for you? What are you still trying to figure out? Can we help?

AMI delivers a practical and scalable approach to workplace learning using a blended methodology that combines online courses with in-person workshops and practical hands-on application. AMI has rolled out 70 programmes across 13 African countries and directly trained over 26,000 people, including hundreds working at investor-backed growth companies. In 2019, AMI was named one of the Companies to Inspire Africa by the London Stock Exchange Group.

Tags:  Africa  capacity development  east africa  emerging markets  Human Capital  impact investing  impact investment  investors  smes  social enterprise  social impact  talent  Training & Events 

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Pact Ventures Launches Revamped Impact Investment Group

Posted By Katie Hallaran, Pact, Monday, December 10, 2018

Pact is excited to announce the launch of its revamped social investment team – Pact Ventures. Pact Ventures believes that markets and private capital can be incentivized to accelerate Pact’s development programs. We structure innovative financing and market-based mechanisms to magnify Pact’s social impact.

Through technical experience in investment banking, private equity, strategy, and social entrepreneurship, we’re integrating private sector perspectives to create tri-sector solutions for complex development challenges by leveraging public, private, and social capital.

Leading with a clean sheet approach, Pact Ventures accesses a wide spectrum of innovative financial and investment vehicles to finance our projects, deliberately matching outcomes risk with financial return. We leverage our impact investments to shift our relationship from donor-beneficiary to provider-customer. In so doing, we tap into economic forces to create market mechanisms that listen and adapt to the voices of our beneficiaries (now customers) in new, empowering ways through:

Outcomes-based and shared value partnerships:

  • Market-based incentives for responsible and traceable sourcing of minerals and gems
  • Access to bottom of the pyramid (BoP) financial products for community-based savings and loans groups

Direct investments in promising social enterprises:

  • Investment in solar home system manufacturer targeting BoP consumers
  • Joint venture with alternative BoP credit scoring and digital distribution services

Innovative business and delivery models for impact:

  • Distribution of solar home system partners to bring renewable energy to Pact’s beneficiaries
  • Workforce development platform for skills-based training and job placement 

We’d love to explore opportunities to collaborate and invite anyone interested in learning more to reach out to Brian Vo at bvo@pactworld.org.

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Tags:  Access to Finance  energy  health  impact investing  innovative finance  social enterprise  social impact 

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The “Missing Middle” is More Complicated

Posted By Heather Soehn, Upaya Social Ventures, Tuesday, November 27, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, November 27, 2018

 

In our industry of impact investing, there has long been a lament that small and growing businesses (SGBs) are the “missing middle” of the space—these are the companies that are too large for microfinance funding and too small for traditional investors or even most impact investors. The Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs defines this space as companies seeking to raise between $20,000 and $2M US with between five and 250 employees.

The conversation has been going on for years, first defined with great clarity in the Monitor and Acumen Fund study, “From Blueprint to Scale” in 2012.  Upaya’s Sachi Shenoy picked up the issue of a “pioneering capital gap with Brian Arbogast in 2013 and then revisited it with our board member, Nathan Byrd, earlier this year. A common theme of all this investigation is that while the potential for impact can be huge in this space, investing here requires patience, capacity building and a lot of risk.

Upaya invests exactly in the “missing middle” and for years we have felt—If not completely alone—pretty lonely.  We invest to create jobs for the extreme poor, which gives us a very particular approach to enterprise selection. While there has been much discussion, there have not been dramatic shifts to address the gaps. Players are entering the space but there is still a $930 billion financing gap. What is going on?

“This Missing Middles,” a report commissioned by the newly-created Collaborative for Frontier Finance dissects this segment with much greater granularity than ever before. It has not been helpful to talk about a financing gap for these kinds of companies because “these” kinds of companies are quite diverse.  The report helpfully breaks them down into four groupings:

  • High Growth – Disruptive business models that could be tech-led, asset-light, growing at 66% in the CFF study.
  • Niche – Innovative products or services targeting niche markets
  • Dynamic Enterprises – “Bread and butter” businesses (trading, manufacturing, etc.) that have moderate growth and scale potential but significant livelihood impact
  • Livelihood Sustaining – Sustainable businesses that may have outgrown microenterprise and are supporting families with incremental growth

This report resonates with us so well because conversations with other seed stage or early stage impact investors sometimes remind us that “one of these things is not like the other.”

Upaya looks for companies that can be sustainable job-producers that return our investment, preferably with some upside. It’s not that we lack the ambition or focus of other early investors who are looking for “rocket ships” or “massive scale.” It’s that we know our market. The “Dynamic Enterprise” group is a very good description of many of the companies that we see and want to help reach 1,000+ sustainable jobs.

In what might be a surprise, the high growth ventures are generally on a trajectory to create fewer jobs due to their business model. So we wish them well, along with our colleagues who invest in them, but they’re less interesting to us unless there’s strong job creation. (As an aside, these are also the kinds of businesses that directly refute Mulago Foundation’s Kevin Starr’s post in the Stanford Social Innovation Review from August. The only key to poverty alleviation is not making sure that the companies that provide goods and services to the poor can scale; starting with a reliable job and income is a more direct assault on poverty, even if it comes in 1000-person increments.)

What this study does so well is explain why the “missing middle” has felt stuck for so long. It’s not that there’s not enough interest in funding these companies. It’s that we need to be more creative in our approach. There is no one financing solution for these different kinds of enterprises. So many impact-driven organizations, including Upaya, are making fairly straight-forward equity investments. In fact, the typical venture style equity investment doesn’t fit well with any of these groups. Even the high growth ventures, which account for only 1% of the segment, are likely to need longer time horizons than closed-ended funds provide.

Upaya had already started exploring what investment alternatives are available to us as a foreign investor in India, but this report gives us renewed energy. It also underscores that what we do really matters. There are not enough impact investors focusing on the “bread and butter” businesses that are the “backbone of local economies and are important sources of jobs for low- and moderate-skilled workers.”  Hopefully, with a better understanding of the environment we’re working in, investors can all be more successful in achieving our impact goals by better serving the entrepreneurs in our portfolios.

 

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This piece was written by Kate Cochran, CEO of Upaya Social Ventures and was originally posted on the Upaya Social Ventures blog.

Tags:  impact investing  Job Creation  missing middle  Pioneering Capital  Social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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The Future of Fresh: Rethinking Our Food Systems at The First Mile of Distribution

Posted By Paula Rodriguez, InspiraFarms, Monday, November 12, 2018
Updated: Monday, November 12, 2018

To all ANDE members, this is a formal invitation to join InspiraFarms side event, The Future of Fresh: Rethinking Our Food Systems at The First Mile of Distribution, the 20th of November, 2018, 6pm. 

We will follow the Financial Times Global Food Systems event with food, drinks and a vivid discussion around challenges and solutions for first-mile distribution, emerging market agribusiness competitiveness and sustainability, and their access to export markets in the UK and beyond.

InspiraFarms CEO, Tim Chambers, will open the event, and welcome our key note speaker Dan Haglund, Senior Private Sector Development Adviser, at the Department for International Development (DFID) who will talk about ‘The role of the private sector in transforming the global food industry into a more sustainable and inclusive system.’

We will present the international joint research project, in partnership with the private sector, DFID and the Shell Foundation, analysing solutions to post-harvest food losses and sharing insights from ongoing field trials.

Julie Hanson, European Director of the Global Cold Chain Alliance, ‘The cold chain industry’s response to the first mile distribution challenge.’

The event will conclude with the debut of a new mini-documentary, ‘The Future of Fresh - rethinking our food systems at the first mile of distribution’.

Join us!!

To register send us an email to inspira@gongcommunications.com 

http://www.inspirafarms.com/the-future-of-fresh-side-event/

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Tags:  agribusiness  Agriculture  impact investing 

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Need Help Identifying Your Organization’s Legal Needs? Find Out About TrustLaw’s Legal Health Check for Social Enterprises.

Posted By Flavie Fuentes, Thomson Reuters Foundation, Friday, October 19, 2018
Updated: Friday, October 19, 2018

Who we are? TrustLaw is the Thomson Reuters Foundation’s global pro bono legal program, connecting the best law firms and corporate legal teams around the world with high-impact NGOs and social enterprises working to create social and environmental change. We help produce groundbreaking legal research and offer innovative training courses worldwide. We also provide a legal training for social enterprises and impact investing that focuses on legal issues and trends in the burgeoning social innovation sector, and provides lawyers with the skills and knowledge they need to advise clients. We have supported grassroots organizations to employ their first staff members, helped vulnerable women access loans to start their first businesses and brought renewable energy lighting to slums. We are the largest global pro bono network with almost 5,000 members across more than 175 countries. We work with hundreds of legal teams representing over 120,000 lawyers who generously provide free legal support to thousands of NGOs and social enterprises.

What is the Legal Health Check and How Does it Work? Every year, TrustLaw receives and reviews hundreds of legal questions from our NGO and social enterprise members around the world and connects these organizations to pro bono lawyers who provide free expert advice and assistance. Drawing on our experience, TrustLaw has developed a Legal Health Check to assist NGOS and social enterprises identify some of their operational legal needs. While it includes the questions most frequently asked by our members, it is not a complete list of legal issues. The Legal Health Check will help you identify legal matters that are relevant to your organization and issues that you might need help with. Take a look at the Legal Health Check for more information here.

Interested in Becoming a Member of TrustLaw? If you would like to apply to become a member of TrustLaw, you can complete our application form on our website at http://www.trust.org/trustlaw/ and make sure to tell us that you are also an ANDE member!

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Tags:  Access to Finance  ANDE Members  ANDE publication  Impact investing  Legal Working Group  Pro Bono  social enterprise  Social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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Survey: Gender-lens Investing in LAC

Posted By Daniela Moctezuma, Value for Women, Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Are you an investor or organization supporting SGBs actively in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)? Please take 15 minutes to fill out the Value for Women survey on Gender-lens Investing in LAC, financed by the ANDE Catalyst Fund that seeks to provide investors, SGBs, and other ANDE members with a clear landscape of how impact investors use and see gender in their work. The survey will also serve as a way to identify best practices so please fill out and share your work with us!


Please fill out the Spanish language survey here before 11:59pm (Mexico City, Central Standard Time) on November 5th.


In case the link above does not work please click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V4WANDE

 
 If you have any questions, please write to Luis Márquez (lmarquez@v4w.org) with a copy to Daniela Moctezuma (dmoctezuma@v4w.org).

Thank you!

Tags:  ANDE Members  entrepreneurship ecosystems  impact investing  impact investment  Latin America  social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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SEAF Launches Gender Equality Scorecard ©

Posted By Robert Webster, Small Enterprise Assistance Funds (SEAF), Monday, August 27, 2018

SEAF Launches Gender Equality Scorecard ©

 

Washington, D.C. (August 27, 2018)

 

SEAF, the emerging market impact investing firm, has announced the launch of its proprietary Gender Equality Scorecard (“GES”), which will be a vital tool to support the promotion and achievement of women’s economic empowerment and gender equality in SEAF’s global investments.  The GES is initially being piloted in SEAF’s investments in Southeast Asia and it is expected to be used eventually across SEAF’s world-wide, impact investing platform.

                               

Jennifer Buckley, SEAF Senior Managing Director, stated, “SEAF’s Gender Equality Scorecard is launched with the conviction that those firms that realize internal gender equality in terms of compensation, leadership and other factors are superior financial performers and powerful drivers of women’s economic empowerment.  In this way, SEAF sees enormous potential in using the GES to create shared value for women, investors and entrepreneurs.”

 

SEAF’s Gender Equality Scorecard will assess potential and existing SEAF investees on gender equality, scoring across six key gender equality vectors:  pay equity, leadership and governance, workforce participation, benefits and professional development, workplace environment, and women-powered value chains.  These assessments will identify opportunities to improve gender equality and hence guide SEAF’s critical post-investment value creation work.

 

The Scorecard was born out of SEAF’s current gender lens investing initiative, the SEAF Women’s Opportunity Fund.  This Fund was launched in partnership with the Investing in Women (“IW”) initiative of the Australian government and focuses on women-led/owned businesses in Vietnam, the Philippines and Indonesia.  The Criterion Institute, the gender lens investing think tank and an IW partner, has played a critical role in GES’ development.

 

“SEAF’s Gender Equality Scorecard represents an exciting and innovative development to advance gender equality and women’s economic empowerment in the impact investing space,” explained Joy Anderson, President and Founder, Criterion Institute. “We are delighted to partner with SEAF and look forward to the GES’ continued development and influence.”

 

Bob Webster, SEAF Managing Director, said, “The Gender Equality Scorecard is the next key step in our gender lens investing journey and we look forward to working with our partners, including future stakeholders such as asset managers and academic institutions, in assessing its validity and improving it over time.  After its pilot use in the SEAF Women’s Opportunity Fund, its use will be expanded to SEAF’s next generation of gender lens investing initiatives, which are currently under development.”

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Tags:  creating shared value  emerging market  financial inclusion  gender equality  impact investing  impact investment  inclusive business  innovation  womenCreating Shared Value  women's economic empowerment 

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