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African Management Initiative releases impact report: A scalable model that is transforming organisations and empowering thousands of small businesses

Posted By Rebecca Harrison, African Management Initiative, Thursday, June 21, 2018

Does talent development for SGBs really work? Talent has been on the SGB agenda for several years now, but the evidence base around impact, RoI, what works and why, has been thin. The African Management Initiative (AMI) has released its 2017 impact report, and for the first time, has generated data that starts to demonstrate a direct link between skills development in SGBs, and bottom-line business performance. The report demonstrates how a disruptive and scalable approach to learning has helped companies strengthen their teams and empowered thousands of small businesses, demonstrating real impact and return on investment for talent-forward SGBs. Dive into our impact data and read inspiring stories to learn more about our programmes for entrepreneurs, employees, managers and youth, and for reflections on what's working, and what can be improved.

 AMI in Numbers

The African Management Initiative is a social enterprise delivering Africa’s first scalable solution for workplace learning. AMI transforms African organizations, and empowers entrepreneurs, managers, entry-level workers and job-seekers through practical and affordable learning tools. At the end of 2017, AMI had trained almost 18,000 individuals through structured blended learning programmes in 11 African countries, including around 14,000 entrepreneurs. To date, a total of 55,000 individuals have engaged with the AMI online platform, and have downloaded over 1 million tools. In 2017, AMI expanded its portfolio, working with large intermediaries to serve thousands of entrepreneurs, while continuing to run management and leadership programmes directly with larger businesses, and organisations in health, education, and civil society.

For the first time this year, AMI generated data proving that its programmes not only help build the skills of the individual participants who take them, but also drive the business performance of organisations. This is a game changer in demonstrating how talent links with SGB performance, and in proving the RoI for developing people. AMI data showed that 92% of client leads saw improvements in management and leadership skills among their employees with 100% of clients saying business improved after they ran AMI learning programmes with their employees. Of those, 92% reported an improvement in operating efficiency and 92% reported improved customer satisfaction. As Richard Branson said, look after your staff, and your staff will look after your customers… Interestingly, investing in even just a small group of managers seemed to have a ripple effect more broadly on company culture, with 92% of clients reporting improved productivity across the whole company and 96% reporting improved engagement.

As well as running management and leadership programmes with the staff of growing and established businesses, AMI also reaches thousands of SMEs and entrepreneurs through partnerships with intermediaries – including many ANDE members. The report indicates that 100% of entrepreneurs who completed a post-programme survey saw a change in their business after engaging with AMI. Of these, 75% reported an improvement in revenue, 73% increased profit, 50% created new jobs and 35% secured debt or equity funding. All of them attributed that change at least partly to the AMI programme. To support SMEs and entrepreneurs even further, AMI has designed a new Grow Your Business programme, which aims to provide scalable business development support by giving SMEs the tools and support they need to embed good business practices into their companies. This programme is being tested rigorously through a Randomised Control Trial with a team of researchers at MIT. Watch this space for more data from this study later in the year.

 Read the full 2017 report to dig deeper into AMI’s current impact data and see what partners and clients are saying about the impact of the training programmes. 

VIEW THE FULL REPORT

 

 

Tags:  accelerators  Africa  East Africa  entrepreneurship  impact measurement  innovation  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  Skills Gap  small and growing businesses impact investing  social entrepreneurship  sustainability  talent  Training 

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Three Powerful Tools for Fintech Practitioners

Posted By Jane Del Ser, Bankable Frontier Associates, Tuesday, January 16, 2018
Updated: Wednesday, January 17, 2018

By David del Ser

(Watch our video)

Since we launched the Catalyst Fund in 2015, we have helped 15 fintech entrepreneurs deploy novel approaches to bring products and services to their customers. We have distilled the successful patterns and behaviors we have observed into toolkits and posts for those considering fintech methods for their businesses, whether they be startups or established players.


At a high level, successful fintech startups adopt principles of Design, Risk Management and Product Management, and also put modern technologies like smartphones, artificial intelligence and cloud computing at the core of their value propositions. At successful fintech startups Designers, Product Managers, CEOs and Engineers reinforce each other in multidisciplinary teams to explore the overlap between what customers find desirable, what engineers can build, and what the business requires to grow.

Design

The function of Design is to represent the voice of the customer at all times to make sure a company stays centered on what matters most. Design is not a one-off process. In the spirit of customer validation, designers keep tight feedback loops with customers throughout the product development process, from early prototypes to usability testing of new features.


Through user research (UX) techniques like online surveys and one-one-one interviews, designers invest heavily during initial stages in order to know their customers like the back of their hand; what are their problems and pain points, and how can their company help? In fact, designers segment customers into personas to allow the team to constantly keep in mind different user profiles and needs.


Aesthetics matter. Designers work hard to perfect a product’s UI and its look and feel, so it can live up to the high expectations created by WhatsApp or Google. But great design goes beyond just user research and visuals during early product design stages. Successful inclusive fintech startups map out the Customer Journey and Service Blueprint in detail to fully understand the perspective of the user each time they  interact with the company.


Ultimately, great design creates trust, that elusive quality that all startups are chasing and that distinguishes them from their competitors. We’ve captured our lessons for startups to build trust with their customers through their products or services in our Design for Trust Toolkit.


Product Management

But designers can’t work in isolation; they need someone to lead the orchestra - and that’s where a product manager comes in. The PM takes a big picture view and works to ensure that designers, engineers and marketers all work towards the same goal. Crucially, she makes sure the product or service goal is backed by data and evidence. She keeps the whole process nimble through quick agile iterations focused on the activities of users, from initial onboarding to the retention phase. For example, using A/B Testing and usage analytics she captures details of how each users is interacting with every screen to inform engagement.


The effective product manager is very focused on the key metrics for the business, such as customer lifetime value or acquisition costs. She also works hard to explore the best channels to find new customers, including viral referrals and social media. As an example, our portfolio company Destacame has seen lead acquisition costs dropping to less than $3 through these types of digital channels. We explore some of the different tools and frameworks to help startups focus as they chart their journey from idea, to minimum viable product (MVP) and growth in our upcoming product/market fit toolkit.

Modern Technologies

And finally, you can’t have good fintech without the “tech” that is enabling these new approaches.


Most important are the smartphones, which run fintech apps and also act as channels to find and interact with users. For instance, several of our startups use WhatsApp to offer customer support and drive virality, communicating with users in the way they prefer. Smartphones can also be used to generate and capture user data, which is particularly valuable when targeting low-income consumers who traditionally have been anonymous. In that vein, our portfolio company Smile Identity validates and authenticates customer identities using selfies taken on their phones.


In addition machine learning and other artificial intelligence systems can improve customer value propositions and to automate internal processes like credit scoring using data from smartphones and other new sources like satellites. As an example, our portfolio company ToGarantido is exploring chatbots for sales of their insurance policies and customer support. Harvesting is using satellite data to understand credit and insurance risk with just a GPS read. Worldcover doesn’t even need customers to file a claim as their satellite systems award them automatically.


And software engineering helped Escala and Paygo Energy to automate most of their back-office processes to be responsive to their customers. It is easier and more affordable than ever for startups to leverage affordable SaaS solutions to architect their systems. Likewise, cloud computing is also a powerful technology that offers simplicity, lower costs and flexibility. There is no need to commit capital to purchase hardware and the team requires less engineering talent to keep the servers going.

Conclusion

In our experience, companies that harness the powerful combination of design, product management and modern technologies create better and more tailored value propositions. That makes for happier customers, which is what makes businesses thrive. By driving more usage, the fintech triad can create more impact in low-income populations. And digital channels and automated processes can significantly lower costs of serving customers, allowing for expansion to new markets and reducing exclusion.


Learn more by joining us for our webinar on the Catalyst Fund toolkits during the ANDE Sector Update call in January. Register here.


Tags:  Acceleration  accelerator  accelerators  Africa  ANDE Africa  Base of the Pyramid  brazil  Business Models  capacity development  early stage ecosystem  emerging markets  entrepreneurship  finance  financial inclusion  fintech  Grants Rockefeller  impact investing  impact investment  inclusive innovation  India  India; ANDE members  innovation  Kenya  Latin America  mentoring  Mexico  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  smaholder farmers  smes  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  social innovation  webinar  West Africa 

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Webinar Recording: Accelerating Startups in Emerging Markets

Posted By Abigayle Davidson, Aspen Institute, Thursday, May 25, 2017

GALI Webinar: Accelerating Startups in Emerging Markets from ANDE on Vimeo.

GALI Webinar: Accelerating Startups in Emerging Markets

This webinar presents the latest report from the Global Accelerator Learning Initiative (GALI). 

Accelerating Startups in Emerging Markets: Insights from 43 Programs examines data from over 2,400 early stage ventures that applied to 43 acceleration programs run by twelve different organizations in nine different countries. The report, developed in partnership with Deloitte Canada, compares the performance of accelerators in emerging markets with those run in high-income countries. It challenges commonly held assumptions about the perceived differences between the two geographies using quantitative and qualitative data collected from entrepreneurs, ventures, and the accelerator programs themselves.

In this webinar, we walk through:

  • Data on the early impacts of acceleration on revenues, employees, and investment 
  • Qualitative and quantitative insights into commonly-held beliefs about differences between emerging market and high-income country entrepreneurs and accelerators
  • Reflections from practitioners 

Presenters: 

Peter Roberts is the Academic Director of Social Enterprise @ Goizueta (SE@G) and Professor of Organization and Management at Emory University’s Goizueta Business School. Professor Roberts founded SE@G after many years of conducting research on how the behavior and performance of organizations evolve over time.  He directs the Entrepreneurship Database Program, which forms the foundation of GALI, and has been working with accelerator programs around the world to collect and analyze data describing the many entrepreneurs that they attract and support.

Abby Davidson is a Research Analyst at ANDE, with a special focus on the role of accelerators in emerging markets. She leads the Global Accelerator Survey at GALI, and co-authors major GALI publications, and leads the Data Brief series. 

Practitioner Reflections:

Anne-Lorraine Meunier, Communication and Public Relations Manager, New Ventures

Heather Strachan, Manager for Emerging Markets Operations and Product, Village Capital

Have questions? Share them with us here.

Tags:  2017  accelerators  GALI 

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Webinar Recording: Exploring the Accelerator Landscape

Posted By Abigayle Davidson, Aspen Institute, Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Updated: Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Exploring the Accelerator Landscape from ANDE on Vimeo.

The global accelerator landscape is growing and changing at a rapid pace.  Through the Global Accelerator Learning Initiative (GALI), ANDE and Emory University have been conducting research to add clarity to the recent phenomenon and provide insight into what acceleration looks like in various geographies and contexts.  The new GALI website and data portal allows users to access GALI publications, use interactive filters to explore our dataset of over 4,000 startups, learn about the landscape of accelerators, and search a directory of accelerators from around the world.  

In this webinar, Abby Davidson from ANDE introduces the new website and presents early findings from the Global Accelerator Survey, where users can learn about the landscape of accelerators and filter the results by geography and impact orientation.

Have questions? Share them with us here.

Tags:  2017  accelerators  GALI 

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​Agora Partnerships Launches Application for 2017 Accelerator Cycle 2 Class

Posted By Elysa Neumann, Agora Partnerships, Thursday, March 9, 2017
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BKRdMGQbY_Q&feature=youtu.be

 
Agora Partnerships has launched applications for its 2017 Accelerator program.
 
Through its flagship Accelerator program, Agora Partnerships strives to accelerate the shift to a sustainable economy by providing entrepreneurs who are intentionally building businesses that solve social and environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean with the resources they need to grow. Since 2011, 125 companies working in 19 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean have participated in the Agora Accelerator, raising USD $52MM in capital and creating over 5,000 jobs. This year, in solidarity with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Agora Partnerships is aligning our Accelerator tracks to advance the SDGs.
 
The Accelerator is a 4-month program designed to provide high-potential entrepreneurs with the knowledge, network and access to capital necessary to create system change, through in-depth, personalized, 1:1 consulting; access to the Agora Partnerships’network of mentors, investors, and capital opportunities; and a global community of peers.
 
Agora’s Accelerator program is designed for companies who are solving social and environmental challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean, matching the following criteria: 
 
  • early or growth stage, past proof-of-concept; 
  • currently looking for investment to scale; 
  • legally incorporated as a for-profit structure with basic accounting systems in place; 
  • average annual income of USD $50K to $2MM; and, 
  • with a clear, measurable and sustainable impact.
 
Agora Partnerships looks to work with entrepreneurs who embody the leadership qualities of agency, empathy, curiosity and perseverance.
 
To apply to Agora Partnerships’ 2017 Accelerator click here.
 
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Agora Partnerships is a network committed to leveling the playing field for entrepreneurs by finding innovative ways to drive more human, social, and financial capital to the leaders and ideas that will make our world a better place. To learn morevisit: AgoraPartnerships.org

Tags:  Acceleration  accelerators  Agriculture  Business  Caribbean  central america  energy  Entrepreneurship  Environment  impact  impact investing  impact investment  innovation  Latin America  nicaragua  SGBs; Environment; accelerators; energy  small and growing agrobusiness  social ent  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  social impact  sustainability  talent  Women 

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TA Finance for SGBs - a scarce good down the road?

Posted By Pedro Eikelenboom, PUM Netherlands senior experts, Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Some perspective...once upon a time...

Picture yourself at a roundtable session with the topic ‘financial   instruments to support private sector development – how can business and non-profit collaborate’.  Guest speakers include a representative from a development bank, a public enterprise development agency, a non-profit and an enterprise

It reads like one of the many 'powwows' on the topic, though the invitation to this event has long but expired - it took place in October 2005 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands….


The impact investment eco-system

Fast-tracking time to 2016, there’s a new world created around impact investing. It has grown into an enormous market place for innovative financial (and non-financial) products and instruments. Where investors and prospects meet up, advised by consultants, think tanks, investment networks and so forth.

Many type of impact investors have entered the market, from banks, pension funds, wealth managers, family foundations, governments, development finance institutions and NGO’s. Hereby gradually expanding their investment portfolio into high-risk sectors like agriculture, in challenging countries, and targeting enterprises with ticket-sizes between US$ 100k – 500k.

It’s a shift (change in strategy) by some investors, with many key players shifting their ‘grant funds’ to a ‘return on investment’ portfolio. Is the eco-system creating a scarce good out of grants (in most cases being technical assistance / knowledge sharing) directed to support capacity development within enterprises? 

The true price of grants

Impact investing cannot only be about moving investment capital to riskier endeavors. It’s a combination of capital investments and non-reimbursable investments (the so-called grants). And the latter being a crucial factor in supporting the public good impact through technical assistance or capacity building trajectories for the beneficiaries. Neither is it a combination of 90-10, where grants serve as a bit of technical assistance on the side.

Reaching the enterprises that have growth potential but limited access to finance, means taking risk (call it technical assistance, capacity-building, non-reimbursable grants, first loss, equity stake, if you like) through a structured deal proposal between the impact investor, (perhaps) a development bank, an NGO, a technical service provider and so forth.

Several studies have stated that there is sufficient capital in the world to invest in small and medium sized enterprises (the ‘missing-middle’), in volatile sectors and in frontier markets. So money is not the issue – though the non-reimbursable investments are unfortunately becoming a scarce good due to policy changes within the public and non-profit sector.

However, beyond the non-profit community, grants are often perceived as ‘little strings-attached subsidies’, which require no financial returns. Of course, non-financial impact (social, environment etc.) is sought, though it’s based on expectations (outputs, outcomes). If one fails to reach the objectives, basically there’s not much harm done, it is - in the end - a grant.

How can we change this mindset? Grants do have a ‘price-tag’, value or leverage when dealing with blended finance. I’m sure, many investment deals in frontier markets would and will not happen without some flow of subsidies structured in the deal. Surely not advocating that grants should have a ROI too – next to non-monetary impact (social, environmental) -, but we should not take for granted the indirect value or direct leverage a subsidy has in the impact investment space. What can grant providers request or negotiate more in return for their contribution? Elements such as securing a seat at the board table of an investee (steer company’s public good objectives), or commit private grant funding to the related capacity-building program of an investment.  

Transferring skills & knowledge to secure ROI

Potential investment prospects (enterprises) may have fragile balance sheets, weak governance or inefficient processes. For that reason they are often initially overlooked by investors. As the impact investment marketplace is moving towards the ‘high-hanging fruit enterprises’, the power of knowledge becomes even more visible. Short-term technical assistance (related to entrepreneurship development) can strengthen an enterprise, making it robust and subsequently ‘de-risk’ its profile to potential investors.

In the case for professional volunteer service organizations (i.e. PUM, IESC, ACDI/VOCA, SES etc.) – its transfer of knowledge is as crucial as the committed capital investment to enterprises. Next to that, these organizations have a wealth of data, network and track-record in advising enterprises around the globe.

In the access to finance space for entrepreneurs, professional volunteer service organizations can play a critical role in strengthening the business competences of enterprises.

The lack of available (and/or affordable) local network of skills and experiences, that can contribute to the range of challenges an entrepreneur faces, is the gap where professional volunteer service organizations can offer qualified, experienced volunteer professionals to donate their time in transferring knowledge with entrepreneurs around the world. 

A structured approach

A structured approach on enabling enterprises in frontier markets to grow is essential and contributes into embracing entrepreneurs beyond the ‘usual suspects’. Collaboration through acknowledging and applying each other’s strengths is the way forward in achieving a sustainable return and impact through investment. And not to forget the role of governments and multilateral institutions in continuing - or at least not further reducing - ODA funded enterprise development programs. Of course, few would disagree with this conclusion, though the eco-system unfortunately exhibits far too few cases to proof otherwise.

For more insights on the role and added value of professional volunteer service organizations like PUM can have in strengthening SBG's as to de-risking their profile to impact investors, download the enclosed (full) article. 

 Attached Files:

Tags:  accelerators  Access to Finance  Business  capacity development  Capital Aggregation  early stage ecosystem  emerging markets  entrepreneurship  entrepreneurship ecosystems  impact investing  impact investment  inclusive business  Investors  partnership  Pioneering Capital  Private sector development  social business  social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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New Report: Impact Investors See India's Social Entrepreneurs Lacking Basic Financial Management Skills To Be Investable

Posted By Upaya Social Ventures, Thursday, May 14, 2015

Over the past four years, the Upaya team has repeatedly heard from impact investors that the pipeline of investable social enterprises in India is frustratingly thin. While these investors regularly hear about interesting concepts, they lament the lack of entrepreneurs who have the business management skills needed to lead such a venture to profitability. In fact, many leading investors have said that a social entrepreneur who does not have a sufficient command of fundamental business tools is not someone they can even really consider an entrepreneur.

Looking to turn these anecdotes into actionable information, Upaya is today releasing the first of a series of spot surveys that dig deeper into investors’ impressions of the entrepreneurs they encounter.

Titled What They Really Think: Perceptions of India’s Early Stage Social Entrepreneurs Among Impact Investors, the series provides data and recommendations to the multitude of incubators, training programs and mentorship networks currently operating in India. The report captures investor opinions about the collective critical skills and competencies of entrepreneurs, and starts a substantive conversation on improving the ecosystem for early-stage social businesses.

In “Spot Survey #1: Financial Management Capabilities,” 18 of India’s 25 most active impact investors shared their impressions of the financial management competencies of entrepreneurs they have conducted some level of due diligence on. The report looks at entrepreneurs' skills in utilizing a variety of financial management tools for decision-making. It also looks at the quality of documentation investors receive from entrepreneurs, as well as the ability of those entrepreneurs to use valuation tools to communicate the financial health and long-term projections of their companies with investors.

Click to download the report.

Download File (PDF)

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  accelerators  early stage ecosystem  Entrepreneurship  impact investing  Incubation  India  Philanthropy  Pioneering Capital  social business  Social Entrepreneurship  Upaya Social Ventures 

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Aren't Accelerators Great? Maybe.

Posted By Stephanie Buck, Aspen Institute, Monday, April 13, 2015

 "We often get asked certain questions about accelerator programs: Do they contribute to revenue growth? Do they help companies attract investment? Do they work as well for developing-world impact entrepreneurs as they do for developed-world tech entrepreneurs? But, unfortunately, the only credible answer we have right now is: “No one really knows.” While there are at least 650 accelerator programs around the world — with new ones popping up all the time — we actually know very little about the impacts they are having on the companies that they are trying to accelerate." 

ANDE's Executive Director, Randall Kempner, and Peter Roberts of Emory University's Goizueta Business School, discuss why we're in the dark on whether or not accelerators work and in what context, and what we are doing about it in this Wall Street Journal article

Tags:  Acceleration  accelerators  social impact  social metrics 

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Village Capital - October 2013 Update

Posted By Lily Bowles, Village Capital, Saturday, October 26, 2013

 

Village Capital has made four new investments over the past month, is launching three new programs (in India, Kenya, and the Netherlands), and has secured support to expand the Frontier Market Scouts program. Read below for the details:

1.Village Capital has made four new investments after the close of our most recent programs in India and the US.

  • The "Tech for Impact” program in Ahmedabad,India, in partnership with CIIE at IIM-Ahmedabad, participating entrepreneurs selected iKure, which enables better last-mile health treatment through wireless monitoring devices, and Edsix, which provides quality education for the poor through an adaptive learning technology. Learn more about both enterprises in this recent Times of India article.
  • This summer’s program in Louisville, KY,marked the first formal pilot of our”Problem-Based Approach.”Instead of developing programs around industries or geographies, the VilCap team has found it most effective to organize programs around the actual problems enterprises are solving–in Louisville, we focused on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions of the agricultural supply chain. One outcome: the two peer-selected companies–Spensa Technologies, which cuts farmers’ pesticide usage through smart insect monitoring, and Solar Site Design, which makes it easy and inexpensive for any home or real estate owner to design and implement a solar project–are building great businesses generating real impact, even though they don’t self-label as "impact” enterprises. These companies were highlighted in a fun Forbes article:"Surprise! You’re a Social Entrepreneur.”

2.New programs launching inIndia, Kenya, and the Netherlands this fall–and you’re invited to come meet the enterprises (dates and locations below).

  • "Edupreneurs,”a program Village Capital is operating in partnership with the Pearson Affordable Learning Fund, features 15 top ventures providing affordable BoP education solutions in India. Learn more about the program here; join usSaturday, October 26th in Delhi for our Customer Forum; or save the date for ourVenture Forum: November 23rdin Bangalore.
  • Village Capital-Netherlands, in partnership with Impact Hub-Amsterdam and DOEN Foundation, kicks off next week. Join Executive Director, Ross Baird, to learn more about the program and Frontier Market Scouts-Netherlands (DeBaak Institute), hosted atImpact Hub on October 31st.

3.Do you know anyone eager to get build a career in impact investing? We’re excited to announce that, with the support of Shell and the Hitachi Foundation, we’re expanding the Frontier Market Scouts program.

The Frontier Market Scouts program, which Village Capital co-founded with the Monterey Institute for International Studies and Sanghata Global, has been a leading entry point for professionals into the impact investing sector. Over the past three years, impact investors such as Invested Development, Unitus Seed Fund, and Accion, as well as enterprises in our portfolio and elsewhere have provided an on-ramp for aspiring professionals.

Thanks to Shell and the Hitachi Foundation, Village Capital has been able to expand the Frontier Market Scouts program globally. Starting with this January’s training, there will be three campuses (with more to come):

  • The Monterey Institute for International Studies
  • The Sorenson Center for Global Impact Investing(University of Utah)
  • De Baak Institute(Netherlands)

If you know someone interested in a career in impact investing, please encourage them to apply to the Scouts program by October 15th–link here.

That’s all for now – we hope to see you at one of our programs or events over the coming months, ANDE members and friends!

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  accelerators  ANDE Members  early stage ecosystem  emerging markets  Entrepreneurship  High-Growth Entrepreneurship  impact investing  mentoring  Mexico  SGBs; Environment; accelerators; energy  social business 

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You're Invited! The 2013 GSBI Accelerator Showcase

Posted By Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Santa, Monday, August 5, 2013
Updated: Monday, August 5, 2013

The GSBI Accelerator 2013 Class of Social Entrepreneurs will present to impact investors on Thursday, August 22 from 3:00-7:00pm at Santa Clara University.  These vetted organizations provide products and/or services to base of the pyramid populations, and are ready to scale their enterprises to impact hundreds of thousands of people in the delivery of healthcare, clean tech, and mobile finance.  Engage with innovative entrepreneurs at this invitation-only event and showcase reception.

If you would like to join us please click here and use the password: accelerator to register. We  hope you will join us for this seminal social impact investing event. If you have any questions, please contact Cassandra Thomassin-Staff (cthomassin@scu.edu).

 Date:  Thursday, August 22, 2013

Time:  3:00-3:15pm   Refreshments & Registration          

             3:15- 5:30pm  Presentations (Recital Hall)          

             5:30 - 7:00pm Showcase Reception (de Saisset Museum)

Location: Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA  95053 (Campus map & directions on event RSVP page)

Tags:  accelerators  Business Models  impact  impact investing  investors  social entrepreneurship 

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