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Social Enterprise Franchising Webinar

Posted By Stage Six, Friday, April 6, 2018
https://www.unh.edu/social-innovation/social-sector-franchising-initiative-webinar-1

Register for this webinar about using franchising to scale SGBs here:  https://www.unh.edu/social-innovation/social-sector-franchising-initiative-webinar-1?platform=hootsuite

 

Social Sector Franchising Initiative 2018 Webinar Series

 

Replication and Scaling for Impact: What are the options?
Does Social Franchising have a competitive advantage?  


 

Image of Family at a Supply Hope MarketWednesday, April 11, 2018 
10:00 a.m.  - 11:00 a.m. (-5 GMT)
Online 

 

 

 

 

In this first webinar of the Social Sector Franchise Initiative 2018 Webinar series we will explore a variety of issues and questions about scaling social enterprises. There is an urgent need to scale promising social enterprises that can meet vital human needs. But are we making headway in identifying the most effective pathways to scale? What do we know about the various options for scaling social enterprises, in terms of their relative abilities to reach significant numbers of customers while holding true to their social mission? Why do many social enterprises fail to scale?  What are the roles of industry facilitators and service providers in enabling scale? We often assume scaling equals replication—what are other routes to scale?

Reaching scale can be challenging and some research says fewer than 1 percent of startups scale. This is due to many factors including: the team and leadership’s ability to manage scale; the enterprise’s business model and technology readiness; fit in new territories; and access to or quality of funding and partnerships.  Organizations often use several strategies, depending on opportunities and geographic differences. Does this complicate scale, or does this help the enterprise adapt in new markets? 

What about social sector franchising as a potential gamechanger for scaling social enterprise? Franchising enables a business to grow exponentially while maintaining standards and achieving economies of scale. Franchising drives economic development by increasing opportunities for jobs and business ownership, and creating pipelines of social enterprises capable achieving higher returns for impact investors.  Franchising   has   an advantage when the business model, technology, and market changes little. It also helps with the uptake of business models by aspiring entrepreneurs. Yet, could there be challenges for franchising when scaling requires more changes?

Bill Maddocks our webinar moderator will explore these issues and more with our four guests who represent a wide range of experience in scaling and replicating social enterprises around the world.

 


 

Webinar Guests:
 

Image of EmmaEmma Colenbrander
Emma is the director of a new initiative at Practical Action that is coordinating a wide range of distribution models to coordinate learning and look for economies of scale. The Global Distributors Collective (GDC) is a partnership-based model that acts as a ‘one stop shop’ for last mile businesses, offering support, information and expertise to overcome the challenges of accessing life-changing technologies. It provides a collective voice for distributors to ensure their voice is heard; drives research and innovation across the sector; facilitates the exchange of information, insight and expertise; and helps pilot, test and scale innovative solutions.

Image of NeilNeal Harrison 
Neal A. Harrison is Associate Director of the Replication Initiative at Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship. In this role, Neal is focused on scaling-out business models and technologies by developing sector-specific playbooks to spread best practices, as well as supporting entrepreneurs design their scaling strategy. He has over 10 years of experience building start-ups and leading innovation projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, North America, and Europe.

 

Image of DavidDavid Koch 
David Koch is a partner and co-founder of Plave Koch PLC, a boutique law firm focused on franchising, licensing, and branded distribution. He has over 25 years of experience with clients in foodservice, hotels, educational services, entertainment events, veterinary, staffing, car rental, homeowner services, retail, and other industries. His work involves structuring franchise and license programs, supply chain arrangements, private equity investments in franchising, corporate and commercial transactions, regulatory compliance, antitrust counseling, and cross-border expansion.

David holds an adjunct faculty appointment with the International Transactions Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School, his alma mater, and serves in a similar but informal capacity with the International Transactions Clinic at NYU School of Law. He has spoken at numerous franchise legal and business conferences, including programs in Japan, India, Guatemala, Poland, Romania, England and Canada, and he has authored or co-authored more than 40 published articles and conference papers. Before entering private practice, he was an Attorney-Advisor to the Chairman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.
 

Image of JulieJulie McBride
Julie is a thought leader in the field of social franchising and was recently named one of “Five Innovative Consultants that are changing the world” in Inc. Magazine.  Julie’s experience using the franchise model to scale social businesses spans 20 years, five continents, and several industries including healthcare, water, sanitation, agribusiness, clean energy, and education.  She was instrumental in designing and operating PSI’s pioneering reproductive health franchise in Pakistan (Green Star) and supported the expansion of social franchises into 27 additional countries.  As a franchise consultant at MSA Worldwide Julie helped social business owners and NGOs design and execute franchise systems.  In her most recent venture as founder and CEO of Stage Six LLC, Julie is building and supporting a portfolio of investment-ready social franchises across a range of sectors and geographies. Her efforts to inform and inspire potential actors in this field have included several high profile speaking engagements and publications.  Julie earned her Masters in Public Health from New York University and her Bachelor of Science from the University of Washington. 

Tags:  replication  scaling  Sector Trends  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  social franchisingsocial entrepreneurship 

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Try, Win and Repeat

Posted By Patricia Haines, Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Santa Clara University, Thursday, June 23, 2016

Miller Center Receives $1.5 Million Gift to Explore Replication of Successful Social-Entrepreneurship Business Models

SANTA CLARA, Calif., June 21, 2016—Many social enterprises address similar problems afflicting the global poor—such as lack of access to drinking water or to clean, affordable energy—with highly localized solutions. But could the best solutions be better replicated across regions or industries, helping lift more people out of poverty more quickly? What if, for instance, a safe drinking water business validated in one location could be reproduced and introduced to other geographic regions that also lack potable water?


To help answer such questions, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Jon Freeman has given $1.5 million to Santa Clara University’s Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship to explore the best ways to replicate effective social business models.


"Social enterprises participating in Miller Center’s Global Social Benefit Institute (GSBI®) programs emerge with substantiated and scalable business models. But to meaningfully address the pressing problems of poverty, we need to amplify the scaling process by working on multiple successful business models in parallel, reproducing and launching them in other geographic regions,” said Thane Kreiner, executive director of Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship. “While social enterprise replication is not a new idea, Jon’s gift funds a concerted effort to replicate effective social business models globally.”

 

Replicating proven social enterprise business models, rather than starting over from scratch, can significantly decrease the time and resources spent on getting a social enterprise up and running. In addition, replicated enterprises also present reduced risks for impact investors. The key, however, is to ensure that the underlying business model is adapted and tailored to the specific needs of the new locale.


“I have always believed that the way to tackle challenges such as poverty or the negative impacts of climate change is by eradicating the barriers to opportunity,” said Freeman, president and principal owner of real estate investment firm Stonecrest Financial, and Miller Center advisory board member. “Social entrepreneurs are more likely to build successful enterprises if they can start with a blueprint or proof of concept that has already been developed and confirmed somewhere else in the real world.”


Miller Center Is Innovating Replication Paradigms

Miller Center defines replication broadly, to include opening new branches of a social enterprise in different areas; offering business models to others in licensing or open-sourcing arrangements; and franchising. Miller Center will use the $1.5 million gift to experiment with replication paradigms to understand what routes lead to the greatest impact soonest.

 

The ingredients of these replication paradigms include:

  • Identifying “originating” social enterprises that have proven business models and technology or service innovations. Miller Center has mentored and trained 570 Miller Center GSBI alumni: social enterprises with well-honed business models whose social entrepreneurs have had in-depth mentoring from leading Silicon Valley executives. Miller Center will document business models and best practices—including type of supply chain, distribution models, operating and sales manuals, marketing programs and more—so that new enterprises tackling the same issues have a head start in implementing their own businesses.
  • Conducting market research to analyze local beneficiary needs, attitudes, and other market conditions. Miller Center’s network of locally based, social entrepreneurship support partners can provide important on-the-ground research about both originating social enterprises and potential replication targets.
  • Identifying entrepreneurs who have the right acumen, passion, and commitment to operate replicated enterprises. Social entrepreneurs interested in franchising, licensing, or replicating successful business models might have different expertise or focus than the originating entrepreneurs—for instance, greater interest in operations than ideation.
  • Replicating incubation, and acceleration services. Miller Center will take advantage of its strong, local, in-country partners to work with both originating and replicating entrepreneurs to localize appropriate business models, and to support the transfer and growth of those business models from the originating to the replicating entrepreneurs.

About Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship

Founded in 1997, Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship is one of three Centers of Distinction at Santa Clara University. Miller Center accelerates global, innovation-based entrepreneurship in service to humanity. Its strategic focus is on poverty eradication through its three areas of work: The Global Social Benefit Institute (GSBI®), Impact Capital, and Education and Action Research. To learn more about the Center or any of its social entrepreneurship programs, visit www.scu.edu/MillerCenter.

 

Tags:  replication  social entrepreneurship 

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