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Spread the Word: Stanford Seed is Seeking Applicants in Africa & India

Posted By Kendra Gladych, Stanford University, Tuesday, May 7, 2019
Updated: Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Stanford Seed is looking for high-potential CEOs or founders of companies and market-driven social enterprises based in Africa, India and Sri Lanka who are motivated for growth.

The Seed Transformation Program is an unconventional, high-touch learning experience that partners with entrepreneurs in emerging markets to build thriving enterprises that transform lives.

The application deadline is 15 June 2019.

Learn more about the program and access the application here.

Know someone who might be interested? Help us spread the word! Visit this online toolkit for easy ways to share the program with your network.

Tags:  Africa  Agribusiness  Agriculture  ANDE Africa  Business  digital economy  east africa  education  emerging market  emerging markets  energy  entrepreneurship  Fintech  High-Growth Entrepreneurship  India  India; ANDE members  Kenya  leadership  Liberia  professional development  Rwanda  Scale  scaling  smes  social enterprise  Social entrepreneurship  social impact  South Africa  Tanzania  Training  Uganda  West Africa  Women 

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Creating a Supportive Ecosystem for Entrepreneurs in Emerging Markets

Posted By Amanda Epting, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuesday, February 19, 2019

MIT D-Lab is excited to share an upcoming panel as part of the 2019 Harvard Social Enterprise Conference Sunday, March 3. If you're in the Boston area please consider joining us there.

Creating a Supportive Ecosystem for Entrepreneurs in Emerging Markets

How can different types of stakeholders forge partnerships and actively create entrepreneurial, innovative ecosystems in developing economies for sustainable positive societal impact. The panel will foster conversations on how partnerships and productive ecosystems can be created, even in the most difficult environments. Panelists will discuss the individual, market-level and systemic impacts of creating more inclusive, productive 'entrepreneurial ecosystems' based on their experiences.

Tags:  ANDE Members  entrepreneurship ecosystems  innovation  Social entrepreneurship 

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Codifying "What Works" in Social Venture Business Planning

Posted By Jim Koch, Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship at Santa Clara University, Sunday, January 13, 2019
Updated: Sunday, January 13, 2019
Revolution is not a single event.  
Revolution is finding True North and walking toward it. 
Knowing that you will be walking for a very long while, 
Or always . . .   ”
— From Revolution the Day After, by Carrie Newcomer

On November 2 I was invited to give the opening keynote for the 15th Annual Social Entrepreneurship Conference hosted by USC’s Marshall School of Business.  My remarks described the evolution of Santa Clara University’s efforts to advance the potential for solving the urgent unmet needs of humanity through innovation at the crossroads of technology and business model innovation.  Because this was primarily an academic research conference, I focused on the evolution of Miller Center’s business planning paradigm and its emergence as a practice-based theory for building successful social ventures.  I began my talk by specifying that the business planning process must empower social venture start-up teams:

    1. To raise money
    2. To maximize the social impact of the enterprise
    3. To operate the enterprise with a surplus (positive cash flow)
    4. To grow (scale) the social impact (and income) of the enterprise at a rate faster than the growth of expenses
    5. And, to ensure their enterprise provides a needed solution to a real problem in an effective and efficient manner

The first four of these criteria speak to the ability to achieve both social benefit and financial viability.  The fifth factor speaks to the importance of organizational learning and entrepreneurial adaptation.

In addition to specifying these criteria I cited compelling evidence of Miller Center’s efficacy in supporting the scaling up of social ventures and advancing the social entrepreneurship movement:

    • $940 million dollars has been raised by ventures accelerated through Miller Center’s Global Social Benefit Institute (GSBI®)
    • Since their graduation, 320 million lives have been positively impacted by GSBI alumni
    • From 7 ventures served in its 2003 pilot, by 2018 the GSBI has grown to serve more than 900 ventures across 60+ countries

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Most importantly, from its pilot in 2003 to today, Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship has been a learning organization.  To scale its delivery capacity, it has segmented its market and developed alternative delivery modalities—including a mentor-supported distance learning process and other adapted forms for serving the needs of ventures in a wide range of geographies, with varying local resources, and at the different stages of development and investment readiness illustrated below:

STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT READINESS FACTORS

    • Early Stage
    • - Viable product or service

    • - Potential market quantified

    • - Evidence of market acceptance                                       

    • Early growth
    • - Successful market trial

    • - Product or service can be replicated                                                       

    • Rapid growth
    • - Ventures processes can be scaled to volume

    • - Evidence of significant market

    • - Product or service can be delivered with positive cash flow

From the beginning of our work, Eric Carlson and I realized we had more to learn from social ventures embedded in diverse cultures with severe resource constraints than we had to teach.  To illustrate the importance of humility and learning, I asked an award-winning documentary producer and colleague, Mike Whalen, to capture the experience of social entrepreneurs and their mentors in the 2006 GSBI cohort. His short video, A Pedagogy of Accompaniment vividly illustrates how the lives of both social entrepreneurs and their mentors are transformed by the experience of collaborating to create a better world through the development of sustainable and scalable solutions for serving urgent unmet human needs.  I shared this video with my academic colleagues at the USC conference and have been amazed by the many comments I’ve received from them about how this historic video evoked imagination about the “possibilities” for systems change and the potential for value-added scholarly work across the diverse cultures and many countries represented by conference attendees.

For a look back in time here’s a link to A Pedagogy of Accompaniment:

MENTORS AS THE SECRET SAUCE OF MILLER CENTER'S GLOBAL SOCIAL BENEFIT INSTITUTE

In writing Building a Successful Social Venture—A Social Entrepreneur’s Guide, Eric and I sought to capture the informal knowledge of the more than 200 mentors who have worked with social entrepreneurs at Miller Center, with a particular focus on the roughly first 50+ individuals we vetted during the first decade of the GSBI program.  These individuals were selected based on a variety of factors with a particular emphasis on C-level or senior management experience in Silicon Valley start-ups, general management or P and L experience, and/or acumen in marketing, finance, or operations and supply chain management. An additional “intangible” factor proved to be critical to the success or failure of GSBI mentorsthe ability to listen with humility in order to understand how their knowledge could be bridged to efforts to serve unmet needs at the base of the economic pyramid.

Mentor 2.png

There is an important distinction between explicit (formal) knowledge—the kind possessed by scholars attending the 15th Annual Social Entrepreneurship Conference—and the implicit (informal) knowledge of successful entrepreneurs.  Mentors in the GSBI rely primarily on implicit knowledge.  The learning organization emphasis in Miller Center required that this knowledge—honed in the munificent environment of Silicon Valley—be adapted to the specific characteristics of markets in poor communities, including local culture and environmental constraints.  Similarly, it required mentors to bridge technology knowledge rooted in the Silicon Valley to the available appropriate technologies and management capabilities within cultural parameters. In Building a Successful Social Venture (BSSV) we codify the accumulated implicit knowledge of GSBI mentors over more than a decade in the form of explicit or basic knowledge needed to complete each element in the 9-factor social venture business planning process summarized in the figure below.

Building a Successful Social Venture
A Social Entrepreneur's Guide

Eric Carlson
James Koch

Berrett-Koehler Publishers
September 2018 

 

For each of the elements, BSSV also taps the collective intelligence of mentors in the form of a “Minimum Critical Specifications Checklist” for what needs to be included in that element of the business plan.  In systems thinking, a minimum critical specification is a condition that is critical to the overall viability of system design.  For social ventures this translates to the ability to achieve both social impact and financial goals. For example, in element 1—Mission, Opportunity, and Strategy—the collective intelligence of Silicon Valley mentors from their work with hundreds of ventures posits that a focused (10-word) mission statement with a specific outcome measure will increase capital efficiency and the likelihood of venture success. 

This and similar takeaway examples from BSSV are summarized below:

The “minimum critical specifications” concept was originally articulated by Albert Cherns in 1976 as a pivotal construct in socio-technical systems design thinking.  It has since been used by numerous scholars and practitioners, including this author, in the design of high performing work systems.  According to Cherns, the principle of minimum critical specifications has two aspects—one negative and one positive: 

    1. The negative aspect states that no more should be specified (in structure, formal systems, and bureaucratic rules) than is absolutely necessary.
    2. The positive aspect states that we need to identify what is essential.

In writing Building a Successful Social Venture—A Guide for Social Entrepreneurs, Eric Carlson and I have sought to do just this—to clarify what is essential¸ while respecting and continuing to learn from the work of social entrepreneurs  who seek to rewire our systems, our practices, and our mindsets.  Our framework intends to contribute to the gradual elaboration of a new model of socio-economic development—one that is better fit for two thirds of humankind at the base of the pyramid than current approaches to economic development. We hope that Building a Successful Social Venture, based on Miller Center’s framework, will help thousands of social entrepreneurs.

Here’s to a future filled with hope!

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

James Koch.jpg

James Koch is Professor of Organizational Analysis and Management Emeritus and former dean of the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University, where he also served as acting dean of the School of Engineering. He is the founder of Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship (previously the Center for Science, Technology, and Society), co-founder of the Tech AwardsTechnology Benefiting Humanity, and of the Global Social Benefit Incubator. In addition to entrepreneurship and social innovation, his research and consulting focus on organizational change and the design of high-performance work systems. Prior to coming to Santa Clara University, he was director of Organization Planning and Development at PG&E, a recipient of the American Society for Training and Development Award for Excellence in the Organization Development Professional Practice Area. He began his academic career at the University of Oregon where he was associate dean of the MBA and PhD programs before leaving to join PG&E. Jim has served on a number of for-profit and nonprofit boards, including Commonwealth Club of Silicon Valley and the Board of Trustees of Bay Area Council Economic Institute. He received his MBA and PhD in Industrial Relations from UCLA.

 

Tags:  Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship  Social entrepreneurship  Social Entreprenuership 

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The “Missing Middle” is More Complicated

Posted By Heather Soehn, Upaya Social Ventures, Tuesday, November 27, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, November 27, 2018

 

In our industry of impact investing, there has long been a lament that small and growing businesses (SGBs) are the “missing middle” of the space—these are the companies that are too large for microfinance funding and too small for traditional investors or even most impact investors. The Aspen Network of Development Entrepreneurs defines this space as companies seeking to raise between $20,000 and $2M US with between five and 250 employees.

The conversation has been going on for years, first defined with great clarity in the Monitor and Acumen Fund study, “From Blueprint to Scale” in 2012.  Upaya’s Sachi Shenoy picked up the issue of a “pioneering capital gap with Brian Arbogast in 2013 and then revisited it with our board member, Nathan Byrd, earlier this year. A common theme of all this investigation is that while the potential for impact can be huge in this space, investing here requires patience, capacity building and a lot of risk.

Upaya invests exactly in the “missing middle” and for years we have felt—If not completely alone—pretty lonely.  We invest to create jobs for the extreme poor, which gives us a very particular approach to enterprise selection. While there has been much discussion, there have not been dramatic shifts to address the gaps. Players are entering the space but there is still a $930 billion financing gap. What is going on?

“This Missing Middles,” a report commissioned by the newly-created Collaborative for Frontier Finance dissects this segment with much greater granularity than ever before. It has not been helpful to talk about a financing gap for these kinds of companies because “these” kinds of companies are quite diverse.  The report helpfully breaks them down into four groupings:

  • High Growth – Disruptive business models that could be tech-led, asset-light, growing at 66% in the CFF study.
  • Niche – Innovative products or services targeting niche markets
  • Dynamic Enterprises – “Bread and butter” businesses (trading, manufacturing, etc.) that have moderate growth and scale potential but significant livelihood impact
  • Livelihood Sustaining – Sustainable businesses that may have outgrown microenterprise and are supporting families with incremental growth

This report resonates with us so well because conversations with other seed stage or early stage impact investors sometimes remind us that “one of these things is not like the other.”

Upaya looks for companies that can be sustainable job-producers that return our investment, preferably with some upside. It’s not that we lack the ambition or focus of other early investors who are looking for “rocket ships” or “massive scale.” It’s that we know our market. The “Dynamic Enterprise” group is a very good description of many of the companies that we see and want to help reach 1,000+ sustainable jobs.

In what might be a surprise, the high growth ventures are generally on a trajectory to create fewer jobs due to their business model. So we wish them well, along with our colleagues who invest in them, but they’re less interesting to us unless there’s strong job creation. (As an aside, these are also the kinds of businesses that directly refute Mulago Foundation’s Kevin Starr’s post in the Stanford Social Innovation Review from August. The only key to poverty alleviation is not making sure that the companies that provide goods and services to the poor can scale; starting with a reliable job and income is a more direct assault on poverty, even if it comes in 1000-person increments.)

What this study does so well is explain why the “missing middle” has felt stuck for so long. It’s not that there’s not enough interest in funding these companies. It’s that we need to be more creative in our approach. There is no one financing solution for these different kinds of enterprises. So many impact-driven organizations, including Upaya, are making fairly straight-forward equity investments. In fact, the typical venture style equity investment doesn’t fit well with any of these groups. Even the high growth ventures, which account for only 1% of the segment, are likely to need longer time horizons than closed-ended funds provide.

Upaya had already started exploring what investment alternatives are available to us as a foreign investor in India, but this report gives us renewed energy. It also underscores that what we do really matters. There are not enough impact investors focusing on the “bread and butter” businesses that are the “backbone of local economies and are important sources of jobs for low- and moderate-skilled workers.”  Hopefully, with a better understanding of the environment we’re working in, investors can all be more successful in achieving our impact goals by better serving the entrepreneurs in our portfolios.

 

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This piece was written by Kate Cochran, CEO of Upaya Social Ventures and was originally posted on the Upaya Social Ventures blog.

Tags:  impact investing  Job Creation  missing middle  Pioneering Capital  Social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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Need Help Identifying Your Organization’s Legal Needs? Find Out About TrustLaw’s Legal Health Check for Social Enterprises.

Posted By Flavie Fuentes, Thomson Reuters Foundation, Friday, October 19, 2018
Updated: Friday, October 19, 2018

Who we are? TrustLaw is the Thomson Reuters Foundation’s global pro bono legal program, connecting the best law firms and corporate legal teams around the world with high-impact NGOs and social enterprises working to create social and environmental change. We help produce groundbreaking legal research and offer innovative training courses worldwide. We also provide a legal training for social enterprises and impact investing that focuses on legal issues and trends in the burgeoning social innovation sector, and provides lawyers with the skills and knowledge they need to advise clients. We have supported grassroots organizations to employ their first staff members, helped vulnerable women access loans to start their first businesses and brought renewable energy lighting to slums. We are the largest global pro bono network with almost 5,000 members across more than 175 countries. We work with hundreds of legal teams representing over 120,000 lawyers who generously provide free legal support to thousands of NGOs and social enterprises.

What is the Legal Health Check and How Does it Work? Every year, TrustLaw receives and reviews hundreds of legal questions from our NGO and social enterprise members around the world and connects these organizations to pro bono lawyers who provide free expert advice and assistance. Drawing on our experience, TrustLaw has developed a Legal Health Check to assist NGOS and social enterprises identify some of their operational legal needs. While it includes the questions most frequently asked by our members, it is not a complete list of legal issues. The Legal Health Check will help you identify legal matters that are relevant to your organization and issues that you might need help with. Take a look at the Legal Health Check for more information here.

Interested in Becoming a Member of TrustLaw? If you would like to apply to become a member of TrustLaw, you can complete our application form on our website at http://www.trust.org/trustlaw/ and make sure to tell us that you are also an ANDE member!

 Attached Files:

Tags:  Access to Finance  ANDE Members  ANDE publication  Impact investing  Legal Working Group  Pro Bono  social enterprise  Social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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Survey: Gender-lens Investing in LAC

Posted By Daniela Moctezuma, Value for Women, Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Are you an investor or organization supporting SGBs actively in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)? Please take 15 minutes to fill out the Value for Women survey on Gender-lens Investing in LAC, financed by the ANDE Catalyst Fund that seeks to provide investors, SGBs, and other ANDE members with a clear landscape of how impact investors use and see gender in their work. The survey will also serve as a way to identify best practices so please fill out and share your work with us!


Please fill out the Spanish language survey here before 11:59pm (Mexico City, Central Standard Time) on November 5th.


In case the link above does not work please click here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/V4WANDE

 
 If you have any questions, please write to Luis Márquez (lmarquez@v4w.org) with a copy to Daniela Moctezuma (dmoctezuma@v4w.org).

Thank you!

Tags:  ANDE Members  entrepreneurship ecosystems  impact investing  impact investment  Latin America  social entrepreneurship  social impact 

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Defining Financial Exclusion: why we need to focus on the problem, not just the solution

Posted By Lexi Doolittle, Small Scale Sustainable Infrastructure Development Fund, Thursday, July 19, 2018
Updated: Thursday, July 19, 2018

There’s a lot of discussion on financial inclusion, the value of the bringing an individual into the fold of the formal financial system, and the potential benefits of that inclusion. However, there is little discussion on what it actually means to be financially excluded and how, because of this exclusion, the lives of the working poor, their communities, and entire institutional systems are more insecure, costly, and constricted. 

This new article from S3IDF engages with the lived realities of financial exclusion with the intention of driving a movement where various stakeholders collectively create an intelligent foundation on which we can develop replicable pathways towards sustainable financial inclusion for more stable, affordable, fruitful livelihoods for the financially excluded, their families and their communities.

 

 

Tags:  Access to Finance  capacity development  Entrepreneurship  finance  India  Private sector development  Social entrepreneurship 

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African Management Initiative releases impact report: A scalable model that is transforming organisations and empowering thousands of small businesses

Posted By Rebecca Harrison, African Management Initiative, Thursday, June 21, 2018

Does talent development for SGBs really work? Talent has been on the SGB agenda for several years now, but the evidence base around impact, RoI, what works and why, has been thin. The African Management Initiative (AMI) has released its 2017 impact report, and for the first time, has generated data that starts to demonstrate a direct link between skills development in SGBs, and bottom-line business performance. The report demonstrates how a disruptive and scalable approach to learning has helped companies strengthen their teams and empowered thousands of small businesses, demonstrating real impact and return on investment for talent-forward SGBs. Dive into our impact data and read inspiring stories to learn more about our programmes for entrepreneurs, employees, managers and youth, and for reflections on what's working, and what can be improved.

 AMI in Numbers

The African Management Initiative is a social enterprise delivering Africa’s first scalable solution for workplace learning. AMI transforms African organizations, and empowers entrepreneurs, managers, entry-level workers and job-seekers through practical and affordable learning tools. At the end of 2017, AMI had trained almost 18,000 individuals through structured blended learning programmes in 11 African countries, including around 14,000 entrepreneurs. To date, a total of 55,000 individuals have engaged with the AMI online platform, and have downloaded over 1 million tools. In 2017, AMI expanded its portfolio, working with large intermediaries to serve thousands of entrepreneurs, while continuing to run management and leadership programmes directly with larger businesses, and organisations in health, education, and civil society.

For the first time this year, AMI generated data proving that its programmes not only help build the skills of the individual participants who take them, but also drive the business performance of organisations. This is a game changer in demonstrating how talent links with SGB performance, and in proving the RoI for developing people. AMI data showed that 92% of client leads saw improvements in management and leadership skills among their employees with 100% of clients saying business improved after they ran AMI learning programmes with their employees. Of those, 92% reported an improvement in operating efficiency and 92% reported improved customer satisfaction. As Richard Branson said, look after your staff, and your staff will look after your customers… Interestingly, investing in even just a small group of managers seemed to have a ripple effect more broadly on company culture, with 92% of clients reporting improved productivity across the whole company and 96% reporting improved engagement.

As well as running management and leadership programmes with the staff of growing and established businesses, AMI also reaches thousands of SMEs and entrepreneurs through partnerships with intermediaries – including many ANDE members. The report indicates that 100% of entrepreneurs who completed a post-programme survey saw a change in their business after engaging with AMI. Of these, 75% reported an improvement in revenue, 73% increased profit, 50% created new jobs and 35% secured debt or equity funding. All of them attributed that change at least partly to the AMI programme. To support SMEs and entrepreneurs even further, AMI has designed a new Grow Your Business programme, which aims to provide scalable business development support by giving SMEs the tools and support they need to embed good business practices into their companies. This programme is being tested rigorously through a Randomised Control Trial with a team of researchers at MIT. Watch this space for more data from this study later in the year.

 Read the full 2017 report to dig deeper into AMI’s current impact data and see what partners and clients are saying about the impact of the training programmes. 

VIEW THE FULL REPORT

 

 

Tags:  accelerators  Africa  East Africa  entrepreneurship  impact measurement  innovation  SGBs; accelerators; East Africa  Skills Gap  small and growing businesses impact investing  social entrepreneurship  sustainability  talent  Training 

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SEPTEMBER OPPORTUNITY - STREET BUSINESS SCHOOL

Posted By Amy Yanda-Lee, BeadforLife, Monday, June 4, 2018
 
Street Business School announces it is accepting applications for its transformative workshop that teaches other organizations how to train Street Business School in their communities. 
  • Looking to take social programs for people living in poverty to a whole new level?
  • Do you recognize helping people increase their income would enhance everything you do, but unsure where to begin?
Get certified to train Street Business School, a ready-to-deliver entrepreneurial training program designed for individuals living in poverty. Street Business School is now active in seven countries across Africa, and the results are transformational: 

-211% increase in income (women are going from $1.35/day to $4.19/day)

-89% of graduates have businesses two years later

-15X income increase for those joining SBS earning less than $.65/day

 
Apply to join us this September and participate in an exciting and transformative Immersion Workshop: http://www.streetbusinessschool.org/workshops/

If you know a group who would benefit from adding income generation to their programs, please refer them to us! info@streetbusinessschool.org. 

 Attached Thumbnails:

Tags:  empowerment  NGOs  Social entrepreneurship  social franchising 

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Social Enterprise Franchising Webinar

Posted By Stage Six, Friday, April 6, 2018
https://www.unh.edu/social-innovation/social-sector-franchising-initiative-webinar-1

Register for this webinar about using franchising to scale SGBs here:  https://www.unh.edu/social-innovation/social-sector-franchising-initiative-webinar-1?platform=hootsuite

 

Social Sector Franchising Initiative 2018 Webinar Series

 

Replication and Scaling for Impact: What are the options?
Does Social Franchising have a competitive advantage?  


 

Image of Family at a Supply Hope MarketWednesday, April 11, 2018 
10:00 a.m.  - 11:00 a.m. (-5 GMT)
Online 

 

 

 

 

In this first webinar of the Social Sector Franchise Initiative 2018 Webinar series we will explore a variety of issues and questions about scaling social enterprises. There is an urgent need to scale promising social enterprises that can meet vital human needs. But are we making headway in identifying the most effective pathways to scale? What do we know about the various options for scaling social enterprises, in terms of their relative abilities to reach significant numbers of customers while holding true to their social mission? Why do many social enterprises fail to scale?  What are the roles of industry facilitators and service providers in enabling scale? We often assume scaling equals replication—what are other routes to scale?

Reaching scale can be challenging and some research says fewer than 1 percent of startups scale. This is due to many factors including: the team and leadership’s ability to manage scale; the enterprise’s business model and technology readiness; fit in new territories; and access to or quality of funding and partnerships.  Organizations often use several strategies, depending on opportunities and geographic differences. Does this complicate scale, or does this help the enterprise adapt in new markets? 

What about social sector franchising as a potential gamechanger for scaling social enterprise? Franchising enables a business to grow exponentially while maintaining standards and achieving economies of scale. Franchising drives economic development by increasing opportunities for jobs and business ownership, and creating pipelines of social enterprises capable achieving higher returns for impact investors.  Franchising   has   an advantage when the business model, technology, and market changes little. It also helps with the uptake of business models by aspiring entrepreneurs. Yet, could there be challenges for franchising when scaling requires more changes?

Bill Maddocks our webinar moderator will explore these issues and more with our four guests who represent a wide range of experience in scaling and replicating social enterprises around the world.

 


 

Webinar Guests:
 

Image of EmmaEmma Colenbrander
Emma is the director of a new initiative at Practical Action that is coordinating a wide range of distribution models to coordinate learning and look for economies of scale. The Global Distributors Collective (GDC) is a partnership-based model that acts as a ‘one stop shop’ for last mile businesses, offering support, information and expertise to overcome the challenges of accessing life-changing technologies. It provides a collective voice for distributors to ensure their voice is heard; drives research and innovation across the sector; facilitates the exchange of information, insight and expertise; and helps pilot, test and scale innovative solutions.

Image of NeilNeal Harrison 
Neal A. Harrison is Associate Director of the Replication Initiative at Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship. In this role, Neal is focused on scaling-out business models and technologies by developing sector-specific playbooks to spread best practices, as well as supporting entrepreneurs design their scaling strategy. He has over 10 years of experience building start-ups and leading innovation projects in Sub-Saharan Africa, North America, and Europe.

 

Image of DavidDavid Koch 
David Koch is a partner and co-founder of Plave Koch PLC, a boutique law firm focused on franchising, licensing, and branded distribution. He has over 25 years of experience with clients in foodservice, hotels, educational services, entertainment events, veterinary, staffing, car rental, homeowner services, retail, and other industries. His work involves structuring franchise and license programs, supply chain arrangements, private equity investments in franchising, corporate and commercial transactions, regulatory compliance, antitrust counseling, and cross-border expansion.

David holds an adjunct faculty appointment with the International Transactions Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School, his alma mater, and serves in a similar but informal capacity with the International Transactions Clinic at NYU School of Law. He has spoken at numerous franchise legal and business conferences, including programs in Japan, India, Guatemala, Poland, Romania, England and Canada, and he has authored or co-authored more than 40 published articles and conference papers. Before entering private practice, he was an Attorney-Advisor to the Chairman of the U.S. Federal Trade Commission.
 

Image of JulieJulie McBride
Julie is a thought leader in the field of social franchising and was recently named one of “Five Innovative Consultants that are changing the world” in Inc. Magazine.  Julie’s experience using the franchise model to scale social businesses spans 20 years, five continents, and several industries including healthcare, water, sanitation, agribusiness, clean energy, and education.  She was instrumental in designing and operating PSI’s pioneering reproductive health franchise in Pakistan (Green Star) and supported the expansion of social franchises into 27 additional countries.  As a franchise consultant at MSA Worldwide Julie helped social business owners and NGOs design and execute franchise systems.  In her most recent venture as founder and CEO of Stage Six LLC, Julie is building and supporting a portfolio of investment-ready social franchises across a range of sectors and geographies. Her efforts to inform and inspire potential actors in this field have included several high profile speaking engagements and publications.  Julie earned her Masters in Public Health from New York University and her Bachelor of Science from the University of Washington. 

Tags:  replication  scaling  Sector Trends  social enterprise  social entrepreneurship  social franchisingsocial entrepreneurship 

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